knowledge

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  • Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Of the three, I can't think of any instance when I would use ' knowledge on'.

    We do need some sort of context- you must at least have a sentence in which you want to use "knowledge + ?". Sometimes usage is optional; sometimes it depends on variety of English; sometimes it depends on 'collocation', which means words usually used together for no very obvious reason.
    Otherwise, a dictionary is as good as anything.

    Hermione
     

    Richardandreherrera

    Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    I wrote a review in Amazon.com about a book, more or less the following: "Anyone who wants to deepen his/her knowledge on Latin American literature." Is it ok?
     
    Last edited:

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I wrote a review in Amazon.com about a book, more or less the following: "Anyone who wants to deepen his/her knowledge on Latin American literature." Is it ok?
    I wouldn't use "on" in that sentence, Richard Andre Herrera. I'd use "of". However, I have heard and read others use "on" after "knowledge". It means the same thing as "about".
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Hi Richard,
    Thank you for the context.
    I would use "knowledge of Latin-American literature".
    As a generalisation, I'd say it is most often "knowledge of something".

    :)

    Hermione
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    "Knowledge of Latin-American literature" is what I, and I believe most native speakers, would usually say or write.

    "Knowledge about ..." is also correct, but less common even though the usage "to know about something" is standard. You could write "Anyone who wants to know more about Latin-American literature ..." if you wanted to. That also avoids the problem of gender-specific pronouns.

    "Knowledge on ..." is an error. One does not "know on" something in English.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    "Knowledge of Latin-American literature" is what I, and I believe most native speakers, would usually say or write.

    "Knowledge about ..." is also correct, but less common even though the usage "to know about something" is standard. You could write "Anyone who wants to know more about Latin-American literature ..." if you wanted to. That also avoids the problem of gender-specific pronouns.

    "Knowledge on ..." is an error. One does not "know on" something in English.
    Actually, Egmont, quite a few native speakers do use the preposition. Looking through COCA* for "knowledge on", I found 311 examples with that combination. Not all of them apply to what we're discussing here, but these do. All examples here come from edited publications:

    ... help add to our country's body of knowledge on a wide range of important issues. (from the Washington Post)

    ...cultural model played a critical role as it provided the context used to advance knowledge on women's disclosure of HIV seropositive status within the context of motherhood in South... (from the American Journal of Public Health)

    ... showing how the work is located both within a singular body of knowledge on " art " as a Western category and that the sculptures and paintings also (from the American Indian Quarterly)

    *Corpus of Contemporary American English
     
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