Koryo Saram

  • Frank06

    Senior Member
    Nederlands / Dutch (Belgium)
    Hi,

    I think this Wikipedia article answers most of your questions.

    Groetjes,

    Frank
     

    piazzola

    Member
    Argentina: Spanish/English/Russian/Ukrainian
    Ah! Thank you
    And how actual day Koreans themselves relate to?
    Are they considered Koreans or Ethnic Koreans?
     

    Freeflight

    Member
    Korean & English
    Ah! Thank you
    And how actual day Koreans themselves relate to?
    Are they considered Koreans or Ethnic Koreans?
    Actually 'Korea' is from 'Koryo'. which is the name of the ancient Korea, the first tribe settled in the land according to the birth myth of Korea. The westerners couldn't pronounce Koryo so they started to call the country as 'Korea'.
    Koreans call them as Sakhalin (Sa-Hal-Lin, 사할린) and considered as Ethnic Koreans.
     

    코미디 갤러리

    Member
    한국어
    I've never heard the term Koryo-saram. Koryoin is probably the most usual term to describe ethnic Koreans.

    I've met some ethnic Koreans from there but they usually don't describe them as Koryoin though. According to them, they're just "Koreans".
     

    sanmusa

    New Member
    Portuguese - Brazilian
    My Korean wife said Koryo Saram is for Sakhalin Koreans, like the wikipedia artcile says, but Koryo Sarams themselves will not use that word for themselves, they would just use "hankuk saram" to fit in with the rest of the daehanminguk saram.
     

    Irochka

    New Member
    Russian
    I am korein saram or koryo saram, but I'm not from Sahalin (my father from Sahalin). I was born in Kyrgyzstan. Usually people from South Korea use korein, and we use hunguk saram, because our native language is Russia.
     

    sanmusa

    New Member
    Portuguese - Brazilian
    I am korein saram or koryo saram, but I'm not from Sahalin (my father from Sahalin). I was born in Kyrgyzstan. Usually people from South Korea use korein, and we use hunguk saram, because our native language is Russia.
    Kandaisen!

    That's right, I forgot about Koreans from Kazakh and Kyrgyzstan, also koryo saram. I had a girlfriend from Bishkek once, while living in Korea, but she was 100% Kyrgyz, not koryo saram.
     

    코미디 갤러리

    Member
    한국어
    In Dongdaemun there are a number of ethnic Koreans from Uzbekistan too.

    As the Soviet Union falls, many of the Koreans in Central Asia moved to Sakhalin...

    Kandaisen!

    That's right, I forgot about Koreans from Kazakh and Kyrgyzstan, also koryo saram. I had a girlfriend from Bishkek once, while living in Korea, but she was 100% Kyrgyz, not koryo saram.
     

    iceager

    New Member
    Korean - Standard Seoul
    This is an old thread, but I should clarify that Koryo Saram and Sakhalin Koreans are considered different groups. Sometimes Koryo Saram may be used as an umbrella term for all members of long-established ethnic Korean communities in the areas of the former Soviet Union, and in this sense Sakhalin Koreans will be included.

    But in the narrower and (I think) more usual sense, Koryo Saram refers to the ethnic Koreans descending from those who were established in the Far Eastern provinces of Russia before deportation and migration spread them all over the former Soviet Union. The Sakhalin Koreans were brought there by the Japanese when the southern half of Sakhalin was under Japanese control, and were essentially stranded there after the Soviets took over.

    The Koryo Saram are mostly from the northern provinces of Korea, while the Sakhalin Koreans are mostly from the southern provinces.

    As the Soviet Union falls, many of the Koreans in Central Asia moved to Sakhalin...
    There, I think you are confusing Sakhalin with the Russian Far East. As far as I know, much of the movement has been to the Maritime Province around Vladivostok, not Sakhalin Island.
     
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