kuluvana <kuluneena> vuonna

Gordon Freeman

New Member
Russian
Hei!

kuluvana <kuluneena> vuonna

I have met this in one dictionary, which is full of typos, so the form kuluneena might be not correct.

Still, it seems to be the essive form of the past active plural participle of kulua.

kulua - he ovat kuluneet - kuluneena.

Now, this essive ending is attached to the strong vowel stem of a word, and I don't know what vowel stem the form kuluneet has. It ends with t, but doesn't seem to decline like olut/oluen or syönyt/syöneen, and I cannot put this form in any of the 51 types here. Please explain this to me.

Kiitos.
 
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  • Armas

    Senior Member
    Finnish
    Hello,
    There's no typo. Kuluneena is singular. The plural is kuluneina.
    As for declination, I don't see how kulunut is any different from syönyt...:confused:
     

    Gordon Freeman

    New Member
    Russian
    Hi Armas!

    Yes, I see it now - this was trivial. Thank you!

    Something good did come out of this, though. When I saw the compound verb forms like he ovat syöneet jo kaksi munaa, I did not realize that syöneet was a t-plural of syönyt - I thought it was some special participle form for plural persons. I have never seen the last part of the compound tenses conjugate in persons in the languages I learnt before - English, German, and French. Maybe this is the reason that it was difficult for me to recognize it. Although, we do conjugate participles like this in Russian, whether they function as attributes, or are part of compound verbal forms.
     
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    Spongiformi

    Senior Member
    Finnish
    Hi Armas!

    Yes, I see it now - this was trivial. Thank you!

    Something good did come out of this, though. When I saw the compound verb forms like he ovat syöneet jo kaksi munaa, I did not realize that syöneet was a t-plural of syönyt - I thought it was some special participle form for plural persons. I have never seen the last part of the compound tenses conjugate in persons in the languages I learnt before - English, German, and French. Maybe this is the reason that it was difficult for me to recognize it. Although, we do conjugate participles like this in Russian, whether they function as attributes, or are part of compound verbal forms.
    One does not simply walk into Mordor or compare the complexity of Finnish grammar to English, German, or French grammar!
     

    n8abx9

    Member
    German - Germany
    "One does not simply walk into Mordor or compare the complexity of Finnish grammar to English, German, or French grammar!"
    lol

    Kun te juuri puhutte tästä: Mietin ihan äsken, mitä tarkoittaa "kuluvana vuonna". Sanakirja antaa "viime vuonna", MUTTA "kuluva" on selvästi preesens eli ykköspartisiippi. Mun mielestä sen pitäisi tarkoittaa "tänä vuonna", koska kuluva vuosi on se vuosi, joka "kuluu" juuri nyt. "Viime vuonna" olisi sitten "kuluneena vuonna". Ono se virhe sanakirjassa vai enkö ymmärrä oikein?
     

    Marko55

    Member
    Finnish
    Olet oikeassa:
    kuluvana vuonna = tänä vuonna
    kuluneena vuonna = viime vuonna

    Kun vuosi on loppumassa, kulunut vuosi voi tietenkin viitata "tähän" vuoteen. Tässä esimerkkilauseessa kulunut vuosi viittaa vuoteen 2019:
    Vuoden lähestyessä loppuaan haluamme kiittää kaikkia asiakkaitamme kuluneesta vuodesta ja toivottaa kaikille
    Rauhallista Joulun aikaa sekä Menestyksekästä vuotta 2020.
    (9.12.2019)
    Joulukuun tervehdys | Deekax Air Oy
     
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    n8abx9

    Member
    German - Germany
    For how long exactly did you study French then?

    je suis allé(e)
    tu es allé(e)
    il est allé
    elle est allée
    nous sommes allé(e)S
    vous êtes allé(e)S
    ils sont alléS
    elles sont alléeS

    Same in future tense (ils seront allé(e)S ...). With the additional complication in French that one needs to watch out for gender as well.
     

    Gordon Freeman

    New Member
    Russian
    Hi n8,

    For how long exactly did you study French then?
    That's right - not for too long, and there was German in-between. I don't care much about the grammar at first - only to the extent when not knowing certain things slows down the progress, or makes it impossible. So I don't doubt that I overlooked lots of marginal cases. But this approach has already proven to be effective for me.

    I just took a look, and this agreeament seems to be the case only with certain kind of verbs - reflexive, reciprocal - and when some other conditions are met. In all the other cases there is no agreement.

    So yes, this means that French inflects heavier than I thought. Thank you!
     
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