La calma è la virtù dei forti

stexxred

New Member
Italiano
La calma è la virtù dei forti

come posso dire in English?
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • Paulfromitaly

    MODerator
    Italian
    I was wondering if it would sound better as:

    If you are strong, being in control of your temper will serve you well.

    or

    A cool head is an asset to the physically strong.
    Here strong doesn't necessarily mean "physically strong" but it refers to people who have the power and are resolute.
     

    brian

    Senior Member
    AmE (New Orleans)
    "I forti" are those with strong will power, conviction, resolution, etc. But with that strength comes the responsibility to remain calm, collected, cool.

    I don't really like "calm" as a noun here -- it reminds me of the calm of a storm, which is more physical and less abstract (not a virtue). "Calmness" sounds slightly better to me, though not all too poetic.
     

    sincopear

    Member
    Italian
    I think that here "calm" doen't make sense and should be replaced by "patience", so the proverb might be : "Good things come to those who wait" or something like that.
     

    Pietruzzo

    Senior Member
    Italian
    To me the meaning of this saying is not that strong people should be patient but, on the contrary, that you recognize a strong person from their calmness. A strong person doesn't need to be much aggressive because they're going to be respected any case.
    My attempt: "The calm one, the cool one"
     

    Archilochus

    Senior Member
    American English
    Patience is the virtue of the strong.

    This site translates it as "The calm is the virtue of the strong". But I've seen it as, "La pazienza è...".

    "The calm is the virtue... "is not idiomatic at all. If anything, it would be "Calmness is the virtue...".

    "Patience is the virtue of the strong." seems to me to be more "proverb-like".
     
    Last edited:

    King Crimson

    Modus in fabula
    Italiano
    The problem I see is with replacing 'pazienza' for 'calma' is that their meanings may overlap to some extent, but they are not synonymous (but I suspect the same holds for 'patience' and 'calmness').
     

    Archilochus

    Senior Member
    American English
    True enough. Someone versed in the history of Italian might be able to say which of the two was the original. I suspect that somewhere along the way "pazienza" became "calma" or vice versa (o viceversa :))
     

    rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    There's a famous poem by Rudyard Kipling "If" whose first line is often quoted "If you can keep you head while all about you..." with our without saying the second "Are losing theirs and blaming it on you;" which means the same thing as the above. Or maybe simply "The strong are calm."
     

    Archilochus

    Senior Member
    American English
    We have a saying in English, "Patience is a virtue", and that prompted my memory that one of the Seven Heavenly Virtues of the Church is Patience. (Interestingly, in Buddhism, Patience is one of the paths to Enlightenment Kshanti Paramita.)
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top