La claca

kuleshov

Senior Member
Spain Spanish
In Spanish, la claca is a group of people who have been paid to appaud at an event: a play, a movie, a TV programme, a lecture.
What do you call clacas in English?
 
  • elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    kuleshov said:
    In Spanish, la claca is a group of people who have been paid to appaud at an event: a play, a movie, a TV programme, a lecture.
    What do you call clacas in English?

    Clappers?

    Not sure about this one, though, because it reminds me of bells.
     

    whatonearth

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    Plants? (i.e. people who have been "planted" in the audience...although this is usually used in reference to (usually) politic debates/discussions...)
     

    nikvin

    Senior Member
    UK/France English/French/Spanish
    Never thought about piad clappers, but the awful taped laughter one ofetnb hears on comedy shows, suggesting it was filmed in font of a live audience is referred to as "canned laughter"
     

    quickquestion

    Member
    U.S.A (English)
    jana337 is right; the others have a slightly different meaning more akin to people who actually want to applaud. i've never heard the word used in conversation, however; most people wouldn't know what it meant.
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    kuleshov said:
    In Spanish, la claca is a group of people who have been paid to appaud at an event: a play, a movie, a TV programme, a lecture.
    What do you call clacas in English?

    a claque is a group hired to applaud at a performance.

    Read more about it at Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claque

    I haven't heard the word used for movies, or TV programs.
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    Diablo919 said:
    Would this apply to people that are hired to go to someones funeral that they don't know just to act like that person had friends?

    Certainly not in English.

    I haven't heard of paid mourners in recent times, (in English-speaking countries), but they are mentioned in Charles Dickens' books.

    Paid mourners are a feature of funerals in some cultures.
     

    lsp

    Senior Member
    NY
    US, English
    shill, better known, but not specific about the "paid" part.
    noun - an accomplice of a hawker, gambler, or swindler who acts as an enthusiastic customer to entice or encourage others.

    claque (a new word for me today :))
    noun - a group of people hired to applaud (or heckle) a performer or public speaker.
     
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