La mutua influencia del castellano y sus lenguas de contacto.

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by 19sunflower, Mar 29, 2011.

  1. 19sunflower Senior Member

    British English
    Hi
    I'm researching varieties of Spanish that exist in the USA and would like some clafification on the meaning of this: La mutua influencia del castellano y sus lenguas de contacto.
    Does it refer to the ways Spanish has affected English?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 7, 2015
  2. maidinbedlam

    maidinbedlam Moderanged

    Vigo, Galicia
    Spanish - Spain
    "Mutua influencia" means that Spanish and the languages it has become in contact with have affected one another.
     
  3. MacAnna Member

    Paris, France
    Spanish
    Hi all!

    You can also say it refers to "Interaction between Spanish and the languages it's in contact with".

    In the USA, you have the Spanglish mix, there is an extensive literature about that.
     
  4. 19sunflower Senior Member

    British English
    Thanks for your reply. I know there is Spanglish, but is there anything else?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 7, 2015
  5. MacAnna Member

    Paris, France
    Spanish
    Well, I don't know for the USA as I don't live there, but I do know that Spanish was incorporated into several Caribbean dialects along with Portuguese, French, English and Dutch, giving "Papiamento" in Curaçao island, just off the Venezuelan coast (and, I suppose, other dialects whose names I don't know).

    Also, Spanish + Italian (in Argentina, due to very heavy Italian immigration in the golden years) gave "Cocoliche", which was an Italianized version of Spanish that peaked near 2m speakers around 1930, and then dissapeared.

    In Argentina too, Spanish + German gave "Belgrano Deutsch", still in use; and the English used in the Malvinas before the 1982 war was heavily influenced by Argentinean Spanish.

    Other LatinAmerican countries with heavy immigration from Europe or Asia may have seen
    similar phenomena.

    African words have passed on to regular Spanish and we often don't know it: "quilombo", widely used in Argentina and Uruguay (along with candombe or candomble) is Yoruba African, so I guess Cuban Spanish must have a greater number of words coming from Africa.

    Sorry to be wikipeading :(
     

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