lad [British English and old-fashioned?]

Dew66

Senior Member
Chinese
I look this word, lad, up in at least four dictionaries.

One of it says that it is old-fashioned, informal and it's British English?

Would it sound natural if I use this word in a modern essay?

Thanks for every one who helps with this one.

Thanks.

Dew66
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I can confirm that people don't commonly use "lad" in the U.S. If you used "lad" in your essay, it would sound odd to me.
     

    Susan Y

    Senior Member
    British English
    Lad is a common synonym for "young man ' in parts of the UK.

    It is also found all over the UK in expressions such as "one of the lads' or "going out with the lads" - here, it implies a certain playful, raucous camaraderie. There is even a newish word "ladette" for the female equivalent.

    It is not a word that is usually used in formal contexts though.
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    To me it does sound decidedly old-fashioned but that may be because its equivalent sounds old-fashioned in my language. :confused:
    PS. Lass also sounds old-fashioned to me and I had never heard ladette. :)
     
    Last edited:

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Lad is a common synonym for "young man ' in parts of the UK.

    It is also found all over the UK in expressions such as "one of the lads' or "going out with the lads" - here, it implies a certain playful, raucous camaraderie. There is even a newish word "ladette" for the female equivalent.

    It is not a word that is usually used in formal contexts though.
    :):thumbsup: The word is extremely alive-and-well in my part of the world. (So is lass:))

    Laddette, though, seems to have had its day. I think they're just called lads these days ~ seriously:eek:

    The youth arm of the Church of England likes lads, for mysterious reasons.
     
    Last edited:

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Laddies and lassies are common in Scottish English. In the Burns Supper, a 'Toast to the Lassies' and a 'Reply to the Laddies' are part of the event.

    The adjective laddish is also not uncommon in the phrase laddish behaviour​ meaning rather immature behaviour.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I may be wrong, but I think part of Ewie's point was that in Lanky people say things like 'Come here, Lad', without any suggestion of immature loutishness, or neo-biblical formality.

    But then if you get on a Lanky bus the conductress (if they still have them) will call you 'Duck' or 'My Love', which has led many a foreigner from the Southern reaches of the UK to wonder if he was in for a sexual assault.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    My family in Ireland seem to use lad / lads as general words for anyone, male or female, and almost any age. It certainly isn't old fashioned there.

    I live in the Midlands and use it for young men, only.

    Don't consider using ladette, it was a jokey creation in its day and it has no currency any more
     

    Susan Y

    Senior Member
    British English
    In Australia - in my experience at least - the word "lad" tends to be used in the more widespread BE sense (along with the delightfully old-fashioned word "larrikin"). I haven't heard it used in the regional BE sense as a general synonym for man/boy.

    By the way, Ewie, I think your conclusion that the word "ladette" has had its day may be wishful thinking - see, for example, an article in the (UK) Daily Telegraph dated 30 September 2013: WW1 led to 'ladette culture' as women turned to drink.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    Erm. "lad" is alive and well in certain parts of the USA. I'm familiar with it. It just means "bloke/chap/boy/dude" or the ilk.
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It is also found all over the UK in expressions such as "one of the lads' or "going out with the lads" - here, it implies a certain playful, raucous camaraderie.
    :thumbsup: I recognise this.
    There's no age limit for lads in Lancashire: I've heard 70+ year-olds referred to as good lads, e.g.
    I suspected this was the case. I don't think it's quite the same here: I reckon it's only speakers who are themselves old who would refer to a 70-year-old as a good lad. I don't refer to anyone as a "lad" or a good lad unless I'm going for a northern effect for comedy reasons: "Ee, 'e's a reet good lad, is that Ewie."
     
    Last edited:

    bennymix

    Senior Member
    To me, an American expat, it's an archetypically Brit expression, and when I think of it use in the US, I think of Boy Scouts--those lads--which are a Brit-derived institution very popular in the US, at least when I was growing up in the West.
     

    Susan Y

    Senior Member
    British English
    Maybe we need a separate thread for the word ladette, but hasn't the word always been used tongue-in-cheek? That's presumably why it is generally used in inverted commas.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top