Lad off!

romain06

New Member
French
Hi everybody,
I'm looking for what is the meaning of Lad off? I write for you the context:
David says: I finish my thesis and back in the real world again. hello!
Karen answers: Lad off!

Thanks you for your help,

BR,

Romain
 
  • SwissPete

    Senior Member
    Français (CH), AE (California)
    Where did you find this "conversation"?

    I am not sure what David is saying.
    Karen's answer does not mean anything to me.
     

    romain06

    New Member
    French
    Sorry, actually I found that on facebook you know the status of people:

    David's status:
    David is finished his thesis and back in the real world again. hello!

    Karen answers:
    Lad off!

    If it doesn't mean anything to you, could you give me an idea about lad off in any context (or you could make up a context if you want).

    Thanks,

    ROmain
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    I checked with "Urban Dictionary" and they'd never heard of it either.

    Perhaps Karen has invented it to avoid saying "F*ck off" ? There are parallels such as "Trot off", "Naff off", "Bog off".
     

    romain06

    New Member
    French
    Hum, it's probably that because I looked for everywhere as well but no good answers ...
    Thanks for your help all !
     

    Angela-S

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Lad off does not mean anything really but another possibility to her meaning f*** off etc. is that she means go off and be a lad i.e drink a load of larger and go out on the town etc.
     

    antarame

    New Member
    French
    hello
    I thought "lad off" was a synonym of fired, dismissed, in a colloquial language
    but in this context I don't know
     

    Hardcore_Linguist

    New Member
    UK
    English-UK
    Hey Everyone,

    "Lad off" (alternative spelling "Ladd off") could also refer to a contest between two men to ascertain who is the biggest lad/ladd (lad/ladd, in a colloquial, usually university-based context, refers to a man who is celebrated for his ability to procure multiple sexual partners, drink large amounts of alcohol and generally behave in a manner most boorish).

    Example:

    Man 1: I drank twelve pints of Doom Bar last night!

    Man 2: That's nothing, I sank fifteen pints of Carling and still had room for a large kebab afterwards!

    Woman 1: Uh-oh...I smell a lad off!

    Hope this is of some use.
     

    buzzinbashment

    Member
    english
    Ah linguist you beat me to it, by a matter of seconds.

    yes indeed I second your definition, this was also the case whilst I was in higher education.
    I am however particualry drawn to the role of the 'woman' in your spiel- she seems to be displaying a certain degree of displeasure towards the 'lad off' in the offing, is this something that characterises a 'lad-off' in your experience?? I for one found that most people liked, nay, loved the battle of wits, hearts and minds between two (or more) prospective 'lads' in a 'lad-off'; in fact it was the highlight for many of their university lives.

    I would also like to find out the French equivalent- I know that 'concours' exists, but does this really encapsulate the extreme nature that some of these lad-offs can go to?

    Buzzin
     

    Hardcore_Linguist

    New Member
    UK
    English-UK
    Hi there Buzzin,

    yes, by definition the lad off is a male-dominated "sport" and as a result some women may find the practice somewhat irksome, even repulsive. For example:

    Man 1: You know that blonde scrumpet who sits behind me in geography?

    Man 2: The one with the massive...personality? (sniggers)

    Man 1: That's the one. Only went and bedded her last Saturday.

    Man 2: Pfff...you took your time. She's done the walk of shame from my place more times than you've had hot dinners.

    Female Bystander 1: Hell's bells I'm sick to death of these lad offs, can't you just treat us women with some respect for once?

    And yes, a French equivalent would be much appreciated, I'm at a loss so far.
     
    Last edited:

    Papa Bouba Pepper

    New Member
    English - UK
    Ah linguist you beat me to it, by a matter of seconds.

    yes indeed I second your definition, this was also the case whilst I was in higher education.
    I am however particualry drawn to the role of the 'woman' in your spiel- she seems to be displaying a certain degree of displeasure towards the 'lad off' in the offing, is this something that characterises a 'lad-off' in your experience?? I for one found that most people liked, nay, loved the battle of wits, hearts and minds between two (or more) prospective 'lads' in a 'lad-off'; in fact it was the highlight for many of their university lives.

    I would also like to find out the French equivalent- I know that 'concours' exists, but does this really encapsulate the extreme nature that some of these lad-offs can go to?

    Buzzin
    Is it possible to use something with affronter?
    I must disagree though Buzzin, that most people love these battles or masculinity. In my experience, bang tidy women (the sort I'm sure you like to associate with) view this kind of behaviour as somewhat boorish
     

    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    I would like to point out, with buzzin, that "lad-off" in the sense in which Hardcore Linguist is employing it, should have a hyphen in it (compare to "cook-off," "dance-off," "bake-off," etc.)

    In the original post, it seems to me that this is not at all the correct interpretation of the phrase. I believe the correct interpretation was given by Angela_S in post 7, where she suggests "Lad off!" as a form of "Go be a lad!" or "Lad around!" The original post's lack of a larger context and ambiguous phrasing makes any definitive interpretation difficult, however.
     
    Last edited:

    Hardcore_Linguist

    New Member
    UK
    English-UK
    Hi lucas-sp,

    agreed, apologies for my careless error there, especially when in this partiular context the hyphen has so much bearing on the meaning. However, I'm not enamoured with your use of the term "shaky English", I do not find it at all in keeping with the constructive and supportive atmosphere of the forum. Please bear this in mind for future posts. As a senior member it is on your shoulders to set an example for both junior and prospective posters alike.

    Yours professionally,

    H_L, UK.
     
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