Lad

Elisa68

Senior Member
Italian
Ciao!

I am sorry, lad.

Contesto: un signore sa che un ragazzo ha perso il proprio padre di recente.

Mi dispiace, ragazzo/figliolo.

Giusto?

AE, BE, AusE, CE...E?:D


Thanks.
 
  • TimLA

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Elisa68 said:
    Ciao!

    I am sorry, lad.

    Contesto: un signore sa che un ragazzo ha perso il proprio padre di recente.

    Mi dispiace, ragazzo/figliolo.

    Giusto?

    AE, BE, AusE, CE...E?:D


    Thanks.
    Appunto, però è molto BE, raramente AE. Vuole dire ragazzo, però con sentimento carino ?figliolo (quasi "my son" o "son" - AE).
    Anche c'è "laddy" (BE, MOLTO scozzese - "Aye laddy"):) .
     

    moodywop

    Banned
    Italian - Italy
    A parte l'uso generico nel senso di "young man", come nel tuo esempio, o in "he's a nice lad", "when we were lads we used to...", "lad" ha spesso il senso di "appartenente a un gruppo di giovani che escono, bevono, si divertono", e che "fanno casino":

    he's gone down to the pub with the lads
    he's one of the lads (one of us)
    he's a bit of a lad

    Di recente il termine ha cominciato ad acquistare una connotazione negativa, evidente in:

    laddish behaviour
    laddism
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    Lad is generally used by older folk in Australia. It's not that common amongst the younger generation unless it is used in jest. It doesn't only refer to a young boy; an adult male can be called a lad by someone who is much older.
     

    moodywop

    Banned
    Italian - Italy
    Charles Costante said:
    Lad is generally used by older folk in Australia. .
    Charles

    In Gran Bretagna lad ha avuto un revival, soprattutto nei media e nelle analisi (pseudo)sociologiche, con riferimento al comportamento a volte antisociale, da "branco", dei gruppi di giovani che si scatenano il sabato sera o negli stadi. Nei giornali si parla di lad culture, laddism etc: the laddish culture of beer and football(Macmillan Dict).

    Questo uso del termine si è diffuso anche in Australia o e tipicamente British?
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    moodywop said:
    Charles

    In Gran Bretagna lad ha avuto un revival, soprattutto nei media e nelle analisi (pseudo)sociologiche, con riferimento al comportamento a volte antisociale, da "branco", dei gruppi di giovani che si scatenano il sabato sera o negli stadi. Nei giornali si parla di lad culture, laddism etc: the laddish culture of beer and football(Macmillan Dict).

    Questo uso del termine si è diffuso anche in Australia o e tipicamente British?
    It doesn't seem to have caught on in Australia as yet Carlo. I'm sure it will. I found quite a few references to it in Google including this one.

    Edit: I also found this one in Wikipedia. Link
     

    moodywop

    Banned
    Italian - Italy
    Thanks, Charles. It's a very good article. It describes "lad culture" very clearly and tells us the phrase has been around for about ten years. Very interesting. "Getting one's tits out for the lads":) is a typical British phrase too.

    Edit: A ladette?:) I've learnt a new word. Great!
     

    petereid

    Senior Member
    english
    Ciao
    "Lad" is alive and kicking in the north of the UK.
    It doesnt tranlate as Ragazzo
    It includes all age groups.
    It is applied on an intimate level "How are you lad?"
    "Who is that new lad over there"
    "Come on lads" as encouragement.
    "Where's your lad?" "He's off to collect this pension"
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    I've just remembered one instance where lad is used by young and old alike in Australia and can refer to a male of any age.

    What are you doing tonight? We are going to have a night in with the lads. We're going to order in pizza and watch the footy on T.V..
     

    Alxmrphi

    Senior Member
    UK English
    If you ever come to Liverpool, it's more than likely you'll see "scallys" (Chavs) and they stick "lad" in every third word of their sentences, it's so annoying.

    "Aite Lad"
    "Sup Lad"
    "Wahya Sayin' Lad"

    It's a real "scatty" term here, though up in Scotland it's used as much as any other word.

    Though in a general sense, moodywop hit the nail on the head with "the culture of the youth with beer and football", but in the north, it's also the way people address one another, (constantly)

    ... Don't even get me started on "Lid" .:mad:
     

    Tellure

    Senior Member
    Italian
    In Gran Bretagna lad ha avuto un revival, soprattutto nei media e nelle analisi (pseudo)sociologiche, con riferimento al comportamento a volte antisociale, da "branco", dei gruppi di giovani che si scatenano il sabato sera o negli stadi. Nei giornali si parla di lad culture, laddism etc: the laddish culture of beer and football(Macmillan Dict).
    Questa la definizione del Longman:
    lad‧dis‧m [uncountable] British English
    the attitudes and behaviour of some young men in Britain, who drink a lot of alcohol, and are mainly interested in sport, sex, and music [↪ lad]:
    the culture of laddism
    Ecco il testo in cui compare "lad culture":
    University of Edinburgh bans Robin Thicke's 'Blurred Lines' from playing on campus

    DJ ordered to fade out track in line with new anti-lad culture policy
    [...]
    The campus ban on Thicke's worldwide chart topper falls in line with an Edinburgh University Students' Association policy, entitled 'End Rape Culture and Lad Banter on Campus', to shut down 'myths and stereotypes around sexual violence' and stop the sexual objectification of female students.

    An extract from the policy argues that 'lad culture' promoters, such as lads mag websites and Facebook groups, "trivialize rape and by doing so contribute to a culturally permissible attitude to rape which is disgusting and cannot be allowed by our union".
    independent.co.uk

    Forse non abbiamo in italiano un termine che descriva bene lo stesso concetto, ma secondo voi come si potrebbe tradurre?
    "Cultura del gruppo"???? :eek:

    Edit: "Cultura del branco"? Ma non mi suona...
     
    Last edited:

    CPA

    Senior Member
    British English/Italian - bilingual
    "Branco" non è male, ma credo che ogni regione d'Italia abbia un termine per questi coatti. :)
     
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