lady who takes care of the children

llunita

Senior Member
België - nederlands
Hi!
Does anyone know how is called a lady who (as her profession) takes care of the children (by day) of people who has to go to work during the day?
(I don't mean a baby sitter, since that is not a profession and it 's done by younsters a lot of times, and by night.)
I hope you can help me!! Thanks a lot!
PS in Dutch, it's called 'een onthaalmoeder'
Llunita x
 
  • llunita

    Senior Member
    België - nederlands
    Well... it's obvious, that profession doesn't seem to exist in other countries than Belgium! It 's like a woman who works in a crèche (day-care center, day nursery). But (!) here in Belgium you can do that job also in your own house: there come like 4 o 5 children a day in your home, until their parents get back from work.
    If there's no name for it in English, than how would you parafrase it?
    Any suggestion? (because, as you can see, my English is not so good)
    Thanks!
     

    Orange Blossom

    Senior Member
    U.S.A. English
    I've heard 'nanny' applied to someone who cares for the children only when parents are away, but this is only when the children of one family are involved. The nanny has her own residence.

    Hmm. If the children are coming to the person's house . . . in the United States some states are trying to limit the number of unrelated children that someone can watch over in her own home without special licensing. Consequently, when more than 2 or 3 unrelated children are involved the home is still called a day-care and the woman would have to possess certain licenses for herself and her home.

    Day-care providers is a term I have heard.

    Orange Blossom
     

    mjscott

    Senior Member
    American English
    Day care provider is what I have heard. Of course, I'm on the same shore as JamesM. You'll have to wait and see a more geographic smattering of names....
    Good luck!

    (Not heard of a child minder before--however, I would know who it was!)
     

    llunita

    Senior Member
    België - nederlands
    Ok... and how could I say it in a sentence? Because if I use one of those words, I'm afraid it 's not really the same concept.

    After her work as a temporary teacher, my mother became a .... Because of that, there were always children at our house.

    So, could I say:
    After her work as a temporary teacher, my mother started to take after /take care of children (at our home)/.... Because of that, ...


    ??
    I know it's not beautiful.. But I really can't think of a good solution :(
    I hope someone can help me..


    Thanks!!


     

    volky

    Senior Member
    Spanish/English
    I don't think foster applies, since the mother was taking care of other parents kids, while they were at work and to me foster implies the kids had no parents at all.

    Llunita: I assume this has to do with your spanish forum about the same topic. My recomendation, you are better off stating that you have experience taking care of kids, organizing activities related to kids, and so on, rather than emphasizing on your mother's experience as a care taker.
     

    deddish

    Senior Member
    English
    I'm not sure if that's what they mean. For the record, llunita, a "foster parent" is someone who looks after orphans in their home.

    You could probably say "After her work as a temporary teacher, my mother started a daycare at our house."

    By "temporary teacher" do you mean she only taught for a short time, or that she taught different classes all the time? If you mean the second, they're called "supply teachers," at least in Canada. :)
     

    volky

    Senior Member
    Spanish/English
    I'm not sure if that's what they mean. For the record, llunita, a "foster parent" is someone who looks after orphans in their home.

    You could probably say "After her work as a temporary teacher, my mother started a daycare at our house."

    By "temporary teacher" do you mean she only taught for a short time, or that she taught different classes all the time? If you mean the second, they're called "supply teachers," at least in Canada. :)


    I agree with the sentence in green.

    Substitute teacher refers to someone that physically goes to the school to cover for an absent teacher, and here that is not the case.

    Also if you are taking care of babies, then you are not a "teacher" per say.
     
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