l'amour, ça fout le camp

learnlanguage

Member
English - Bahamas
Comment puis-je traduire «ça fout le camp», s'il vous plaît ?
How do I translate "ça fout le camp," please?

It is from the Alain Barrière song Ma Vie. At the bottom are the lyrics for perspective.

Does "fout" mean to do/to make here? I do not believe that in an old song like this the word is vulgar.
How about "The love that leaves the side?" as in "our side/place."

Below are some possiblities.
ça fout: it doing, it throws, this is
fout le camp: get out of here, let's go!, get out, about to give out, disintegrates
ça fout le: it throws the timing off.
ça fout le camp: "it is bound to end"
Ma vie, j'en ai vu des amants
Ma vie, l'amour ça fout le camp
Je sais. on dit. que ça revient
Ma vie, mais c'est long le chemin
 
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  • Special Agent Dale Cooper

    Senior Member
    French (France) and German
    "Foutre le camp" is a familiar (even a bit vulgar) expression that means "leave, go away". ("Fous le camp !" means "Fuck off!")

    In the context of the song, I think there's the idea that love doesn't last - a fleeting thing that goes / fades away...
    I can't think of an English expression with the same degree of vulgarity, though...
     

    Special Agent Dale Cooper

    Senior Member
    French (France) and German
    OK, maybe not vuglar, but very familiar. (WordRef writes "très familier")
    I agree about the sense of nostalgia, especially in the sentence you used, "Tout fout le camp" (no "s"!).
     

    Phil512

    Senior Member
    Français - Belgique
    No, a tense of "foutre". Present tense. Third person of the singular.
    "L'amour, ça fout le camp" is an expression of sadness, meaning that love is something that fades away, according to the author. But you can use it in other contexts has it appears above...and via Google.
    Explanation
    Tout fout le camp - traduction - Dictionnaire Français-Anglais WordReference.com!
    By the way "camp" without "s", but I still agree with JClaudeK : to me rather familiar than vulgar.
    And not only Alain Barrière sung about it but various other artists including Edith Piaf !
     
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    learnlanguage

    Member
    English - Bahamas
    Would "screw up" be like "fout de camp."
    Something that is "screwed up" might mean "ended" or "disintegrated." It also has a dual meaning that is vulgar and not vulgar, as in turning around, so something ends up backwards.
     

    Phil512

    Senior Member
    Français - Belgique
    Desintegrating rather than desintegrated. It's in motion, it's being done, it going away, fading away.
     

    franc 91

    Senior Member
    English - GB
    In this context it means - love is going away - I'm losing my lover, I'm losing out as far as my lovelife is concerned. It isn't the kind of language you would use in polite society. There's also the expression - tout fout le camp - which has a more general meaning of - everything's going to the dogs, you can't depend on anything these days.
     

    guillaumedemanzac

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England Home Counties
    Fous le camp! as an order means "bugger off, f*** off, sod off, go away! - imperative "s".
    In the song - Love, it's gone with the wind ( though you could say vulgarly : "Love has buggered off and left me alone!"
    Romantically, Love has flown away (from me). Love has deserted me.

    I assume foutre as a verb is regular!! As in the old insult : Vas te faire foutre! Get stuffed! although I must admit to never have seen these in writing -- Je m'en fous! - and I'm not sure why they are reflexive???:confused:
     

    Special Agent Dale Cooper

    Senior Member
    French (France) and German
    I must admit to never have seen these in writing -- Je m'en fous! - and I'm not sure why they are reflexive???

    "Foutre" exists both in reflexive and non-reflexive form, with a different meaning.
    "Foutre": do, make
    "Se foutre de": not care about, not give a damn about OR make fun of (sth), laugh at (sb).

    Ex: "Je m'en fous !" : I don't give a damn!
    "Il s'est foutu de mon accent anglais" : He made fun of my English accent.

    Note: a a noun, "foutre" is also an old-fashioned slang word for "semen / cum". :rolleyes:
     

    Phil512

    Senior Member
    Français - Belgique
    I do hope learnlanguage now finds his way through the many given explanations, idioms and examples about and around different uses of expressions generally related to the word "foutre" (often a verb, once a noun) in various forms and contexts. Not so sure. So (too) many contradictory elements in so many contexts.

    Let's concentrate on the original question : the meaning of (l'amour) ça fout le camp, an extract of Alain Barrière's song "ma vie".
    As Dale and your servant have indicated at earlier stages in this thread, it means that love is something that isn't there forever : love does fade away (and can come back, the song says !). It is a psychological and sociological observation made by the author of the lyrics.
    the idea that love doesn't last - a fleeting thing that goes / fades away.
    "L'amour, ça fout le camp" is an expression of sadness, meaning that love is something that fades away, according to the author
    .
    It does not mean that the author's love (which one would it be ???) has actually and already gone away or has deserted him.
    So, I am afraid I have to disagree with the ones among you who are supporting this interpretation.

    More generally speaking (since learnlanguage has added that question in the middle of the thread)
    Although "fous-le camp !" indeed means "go away ! " and indicates a wish that this departure should happen quickly, in most cases, there is no certain relation with a fast event or motion.
    No, "ça fout le camp" and "tout fout le camp" in general do not imply that a particular situation or the whole situation 1. has already desintegrated/disappeared 2. desintegrates/disappears rapidly. It can appear to be a paradox but it's an ongoing process, it is progressively happening at an unspecified pace. It is in the process of desintegrating/disappearing at an unspecified pace. Depending on what and how the one who speaks expresses his view, the pace can be fast, slow or anything in-between.

    Hope this helps.
     
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