land in / into Paris [airplane]

robertot

Senior Member
Italian
What is the correct version of the two?

a) we are gonna land in Paris

b) we are gonna land into Paris

Considering we are now flying on an airplane.

Tks.
 
  • GavinW

    Senior Member
    British English
    robertot said:
    What is the correct version of the two?

    a) we are gonna land in Paris

    b) we are gonna land into Paris

    Considering we are now flying on an airplane.

    Tks.

    Always a) and never b). In this instance. Because the action of the verb (land) takes place/will take place at a fixed point located already in/within Paris. 10 minutes earlier, or whatever, it would have been possible to say "we are now flying into Paris (into the area of Paris, from somewhere else, ie outside Paris, or we are entering the [air] space of Paris)". Before even boarding the plane, it would also have been possible to say: "Yes, I fly into Paris, and then board a connecting flight for Morocco [or whatever]", or even "I get into Paris at 4 am, so I'll lose a bit of sleep, but the ticket was cheap."

    Hope this helps.
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    GavinW said:
    Always a) and never b). In this instance. Because the action of the verb (land) takes place/will take place at a fixed point located already in/within Paris. 10 minutes earlier, or whatever, it would have been possible to say "we are now flying into Paris (into the area of Paris, from somewhere else, ie outside Paris, or we are entering the [air] space of Paris)". Before even boarding the plane, it would also have been possible to say: "Yes, I fly into Paris, and then board a connecting flight for Morocco [or whatever]", or even "I get into Paris at 4 am, so I'll lose a bit of sleep, but the ticket was cheap."

    Hope this helps.


    I agree that this is true of British English, but I also think I have heard our dear American cousins say 'We are now landing into JFK' or similar.
     

    french4beth

    Senior Member
    US-English
    se16teddy said:
    I agree that this is true of British English, but I also think I have heard our dear American cousins say 'We are now landing into JFK' or similar.
    Yes, se16teddy, you could hear "I'm flying into JFK" etc. in English.

    Usually, 'into' is heard as entering something, for example "I walked into the room". Here are some additional meanings of 'into'.
     

    carneybj

    New Member
    English USA
    se16teddy said:
    I agree that this is true of British English, but I also think I have heard our dear American cousins say 'We are now landing into JFK' or similar.
    16teddy, If you heard your dear American cousins saying such a thing, then they were just as wrong as you would be in so saying and most of them are aware of that being the case.............BJ
     
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