Landlord / Landowner

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  • kuki_kara

    Member
    UK
    UK and Spain - English and Spanish
    Quite often the definitions for landlord and landowner overlap.

    In essence, a landlord is someone who owns a small amount of property such as a bar, a hotel, or a few houses and leases them.

    A landowner is someone who owns a large amount of property or land which would include many properties, large estates or simply bare land (like fields) and leases them.
     

    Szkot

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Landlord can be used for owners of land as well as buildings, but the word implies that there is a tenant farmer who does the work, as in this quotation from the UK government: 'For a Farm Business Tenancy, landlords and tenants have the right to negotiate their own provisions on rent levels ...'
     

    exgerman

    Senior Member
    NYC
    English but my first language was German
    At least in the US, landlord is not strictly agricultural. It is also the term for the owners of apartments and houses that are rented out.
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    For me the landlord leases his property. The landowner owns property but does not necessarily lease it out. That is all...
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    For me the landlord leases his property. The landowner owns property but does not necessarily lease it out. That is all...
    :thumbsup::thumbsup:

    This works for me. I"m a landowner (40 acres, mostly timber), not a landlord, since I don't rent anything out.

    "Landlord" never, ever, is used in my dealings with the state in our limited tree farm business.

    Note the definitions for landlord in our dictionary. One says it's synonymous with "landowner," without qualification, which is unfortunate.
     

    Copperknickers

    Senior Member
    Scotland - Scots and English
    I agree with all of the above: 'landlord' is the term for someone who rents out property to a tenant, 'landowner' is the term for someone who owns land, and any built properties thereon. The two terms are overlapping: a landowner is also the landlord of anyone he chooses rent his property to.

    Also, one cultural note: in the UK, most land not owned by the government forms part of several hundred large country estates owned by aristocratic families, so 'landowner' can have connotations of an upper class elite social status, which might not be the case in the USA to the same extent.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I am a both a property owner as I own apartments and I'm the landlord of the property I rent out. In the past I could have said I was a tenant too because I lived in property I didn't own.

    It has nothing to do with size or anything, except ownership or tenancy, whether you're talking about buildings or land.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    So it's more a matter of what you do with what you have (lease or not), rather than a matter of space or amount ?
    Yes, that is right. However, "landowner" has the connotation of a reasonably large area of land, say, for example, at least 5 Ha. If like me, you only own a small garden attached to your own house, then you would not describe yourself as a landowner (other than as a joke.) If you own only one small field not attached to your property, you would become a "small landowner."
     

    wolfbm1

    Senior Member
    Polish
    "... my parents are landlords in a restaurant, and my brother is a chef there, so that's a real family business."
    Source: New Total English Elementary. Mark Foley and Diane Hall.

    Could a landlord be a restaurant owner who owns the restaurant and also works in it?
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    [QUOTE="wolfbm1, post: 15918742, member: 388190"
    Could a landlord be a restaurant owner who owns the restaurant and also works in it?[/QUOTE]

    It seems to me that you are now talking about definition 2, which is not the same as the OP, which dealt with definition 1.

    Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

    landlord /ˈlændˌlɔːd/n
    1. a man who owns and leases property
    2. a man who owns or runs a lodging house, pub, etc
     

    wolfbm1

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Thank you. So, in that case, a landlord is a man who owns or runs a restaurant. That person does not lease the restaurant.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    The meaning of "landlord" in the context of a commercial business concerned with food and (mainly) drink is (a) a legally exact term But also imprecise (b) generally understood as "the man who everyone thinks is in charge/runs the place on a day to day basis."

    It would be quite impossible for the average customer to know the precise legal position of every man who appeared to be in charge of such a business.

    In the UK, some pubs are owned under a lease (and there are various sorts of lease), others are owned by large companies who puts a "manager" into the pub; some are owned outright by a man who works there himself.

    All of these people are commonly referred to as "the landlord" as they possess the powers and responsibilities of a landlord.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    A landlord can do almost anything he wants to. :) (UK restaurants do not usually have a "host". A member of staff will meet you at the door but then you may not see that person again during the whole evening. In expensive restaurants the job of host is done by the maître d'hôtel (usually called the "maître d" pron "maytruh dee".) He will meet, greet and ensure the meal and service are of a high standard.
     
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    Szkot

    Senior Member
    UK English
    "... my parents are landlords in a restaurant, and my brother is a chef there, so that's a real family business."
    Source: New Total English Elementary. Mark Foley and Diane Hall.
    That strikes me as an unusual use of landlord. In the UK, the person in charge of a pub may be called the landlord, but usually the landlord of a restaurant is the owner of the property, not the owner or operator of the business.
     

    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    (I'd say someone is the landlord in of something.) The landlord owns the land the restaurant is built on (the building); they may not own the building itself. You might ask Mr. Smith, who owns a restaurant, "Who's your landlord?" and B would reply "Ms. Jones." So the person or character in Foley and Hall's book might have meant "My parents own a restaurant."
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    That strikes me as an unusual use of landlord.
    I agree. It's worth noting that this comes from a listening exercise where two people are talking about what jobs members of their families have had. The speech is spontaneous (many "erms").

    aint't - I wouldn't be particularly surprised to hear somebody say "landlord in a pub" rather than the possibly more accurate "landlord of a pub".

    The meaning of "landlord" in the context of a commercial business concerned with food and (mainly) drink is (a) a legally exact term
    I'm not sure that I can agree with that. The legal term in the UK for the responsible person in premises licensed to serve alcohol is "licensee", not landlord. The term "landlord" in both British and American* law refers to ownership of property and land, not to selling alcohol.

    *As a quick internet search reveals.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I think it's very strange to talk about people being 'landlords' of a restaurant and I don't know what exactly it means in every day terms. Does it mean they manage it for an owner, but don't in fact own the property, or does it mean it's their restaurant but we don't know how active a part they take in the everyday business.

    "My parents run a restaurant" would be a more usual way of describing being active in the business.
     

    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    Thank you. Can a landlord act as a host in a restaurant?
    I'd say it's highly unlikely that he would. The owner, though, especially if the restaurant is named after him, is likely to be present, to geeet the guests, supervise the cooking, service, etc., once or twice an evening circulate among the diners to ask if everything is to their liking, etc. In some family-owned restaurants, one member is at the desk, another in the kitchen, etc., and the chef may come out to talk to the diners, too, when not up to their ears in work.
     
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