landscape eyes

AlexanderIII

Senior Member
Russian
Dear all,
this is from the novel Warehouse by Rob Hart. The head of a giant company is going to visit its subsidiary for a solemn ceremony. Paxton is a guard. Dakota is his senior. Blues are guards too (they wear blue uniform).

Paxton walked across the stage. Eyes peeled, like Dakota said. Blues were worming their way through the crowd, but it was good to have landscape eyes, too.

Does "to have landscape eyes" mean "to have a look at the crowd from above"?
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    There is no obvious explanation for the term in that short extract. Is the text available anywhere online? I can’t find it.
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    It's good to have people who are standing back, so they can see the crowd as a whole (as part of the landscape), in addition to the ones who are actually in the crowd where they can see what individuals are doing.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The only mention I can find anywhere of the term “landscape eyes” is in this snippet from a 1930 book on landscape painting in oils:

    It is said that Whistler commended the first kind of eyes — the myopic — and called them landscape eyes. Such eyes see the close details with precision while the background appears blurred, ……
     

    Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It's good to have people who are standing back, so they can see the crowd as a whole (as part of the landscape), in addition to the ones who are actually in the crowd where they can see what individuals are doing.
    I agree with this. Blues in the crowd see people close up. People at a distance get an overall impression of what is happening.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    As you can see, it's not a standard expression. But I agree with those above, based on context it can only be a reference to seeing the big picture.
     
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