Landscaping and landscape

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AngelEyes

Senior Member
English - United States
OR...

The landscaping around the store is so beautiful, I can't help but admire it.


AngelEyes
 
  • Old Novice

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Thanks, Angel, for the awesome rewriting.
    But what are the differences between landscaping and landscape?
    Since AngelEyes appears to be offline, I'll try to answer. "Landscaping" is done by planned design and usually covers a specific area, such as the yard of a house or the grounds of a public building. "Landscape" is just the land as you find it. I think "landscape" is closer to your original "scenery", but the "around the store" suggests that you may be speaking of a planned space (hence AngelEyes's "landscaping"). If that is not what you had in mind, if you just meant the surrounding view or countryside, you can go back to "scenery" but keep the rest of AngelEyes's phrasing.
     

    quietdandelion

    Banned
    Formosa/Chinese
    Thanks, Old Novice.
    Based on your explantion, "landscaping" seems to refer to "artificial landscape." Yet does "artificialy landscape" sound right to you? If not, how would you way it besides landscaping?
     

    Judica

    Senior Member
    AE (US), Spanish (LatAm)
    Landscaping is when a person preserves or improves the appearance of a piece of land or area (trims and plants bushes, cuts the grass, rakes leaves, or fixes broken side-walks in urban environments); usually as a profession.

    ex. He is in the landscaping business.

    Landscape (noun) is the general scenery with all of its features.

    ex. The trees, the river, oh so magnificent! The landscape is beautiful beyond words.
     

    Old Novice

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Landscaping is when a person preserves or improves the appearance of a piece of land or area (trims and plants bushes, cuts the grass, rakes leaves, or fixes broken side-walks in urban environments); usually as a profession.

    ex. He is in the landscaping business.

    Landscape (noun) is the general scenery with all of its features.

    ex. The trees, the river, oh so magnificent! The landscape is beautiful beyond words.
    I agree. "Landscaping" is "artificial" in that it is constructed by humans rather than by nature, but you would refer to a "landscaped" yard or "landscaped" grounds, not to an "artificial landscape." That sounds like something made out of aluminum. :D
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    <<Thread split - comments relating to the other thread have been deleted>>

    Thanks, Angel, for the awesome rewriting.
    But what are the differences between landscaping and landscape?
    I think you've got the main meaning of "landscape" now.

    "Landscape" can also refer to a painting of a landscape. And "landscape" can refer figuratively to just about anything with "features", such as cyberspace. :)
     

    AngelEyes

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    quietdandelion,

    I have some additional thoughts concerning your students. I don't know just how structured you are when giving them assignments, but I have this suggestion.

    First of all, the reason I used landscaping instead of landscape is because your sentence talked about a place of business, which very often features a pretty setting at the front door.

    Landscape is the natural state of the land.

    Landscaping is more man-made, featuring flowers and shrubberies. We all know that many businsses do this to make their place more attractive and inviting to their customers.

    I would suggest to your students that when they write their sentences about whatever the subject matter is, that they move in closer to the picture in their mind.

    You know that radar picture on the Weather Channel site that allows you to zoom in, closer and closer, to your target area? Maybe you can tell them to become that kind of zoom lens.

    For instance, their original word was scenery and I replaced it with landscape, which zoomed in a little closer to the picture. Tell them to zoom in a little more. What kind of scenery? What do they see that they like? Flowers? Shrubs? They could just say "flowers and shrubberies" if they wanted, and paint a more vivid picture in the reader's mind, just by adding that.

    But they can zoom in even closer. What kind of flowers? What kind of bushes? Were there daisies and tulips? Zoom in even closer. Were they yellow or yellow and white daisies? Were the tulips all red or were they mixed in with yellow ones?

    Since I don't know exactly what your assignment was, I don't know if I'm over-stepping the bounds of their instructions. But if they can picture in their minds exactly what they're seeing, the words will flow and they'll really like the scenery, and their words will reflect their enthusiasm.

    Plus, the reader will be more deeply drawn into their picture, too, and be happier as well.

    These are just suggestions, because maybe I'm not understanding the original point of your assignment. :)


    AngelEyes
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Landscape is not necessarily natural. Central Park in New York City, for example, is the result of artifice, but one can easily admire the landscape there. Landscape might be considered to mean "what you see when you look at an area of land."

    Because of this meaning of the noun, there is also a verb "to landscape", which means to plant bushes and trees, or to move earth, in a way that improves the view. "Landscaping" then becomes a verbal noun, meaning "the results of the effort of planting bushes and trees, laying out paths, moving earth, etc."

    When one admires "landscaping" rather than "landscape", what one is admiring is not the view by itself, but the effort that created it.

    For example, with the Central Park example I gave, both of these would be correct:

    I admired the pretty landscape of Central Park, which was fresh and green.

    I admired the careful landscaping of Central Park, which put all roads out of sight by placing them below ground level.
     
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