Lap up /eat

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kansi

Senior Member
japanese
How vampire bat friendship is surprisingly like our own

To test how these bonds emerge, Carter and his colleagues captured 27 common vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus)—one of three known species—from two distant sites in Panama. Active at night, the bats gallop along the ground, approaching their prey on all fours. Razor-sharp teeth slice painlessly into the victim's vein—usually cattle or another large animal—allowing them to lap up the trickling blood with their tongues. (Learn more about how vampire bats hunt

I guess lap up means a narrower meaning than just eat and drink , although one dictionary says it means just to eat and drink.
I guess the meaning ;to take in (liquid) with the tongue exactly describes The ,meaning of lap up?

One dictionary says;
  1. to take in (liquid) with the tongue;lick in:to lap water from a bowl.
Another dictionary says;
  1. to eat or drink
 
  • kansi

    Senior Member
    japanese
    Channel X laps up everything that President Y says.
    This means it all takes in what the president says? Or or how a dog or cat drinks looks like they do greedily so in this context it is eager to take in and covers what the president says(so we can know all the words he/she says)?
     

    Chez

    Senior Member
    English English
    It does mean 'to take in eagerly (greedily, maybe)' when used metaphorically.

    You accept everything the person says uncritically.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    One dictionary says;
    Another dictionary says;
    Which dictionaries? The literal meaning of "lap up" is specific, and certainly not "to eat or drink". It would be helpful to know which dictionary gives you a definition which is so clearly wrong.
     

    kansi

    Senior Member
    japanese
    Which dictionaries? The literal meaning of "lap up" is specific, and certainly not "to eat or drink". It would be helpful to know which dictionary gives you a definition which is so clearly wrong.
    I just put the words in the search box here and this dictionary says it.

    Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
    lap upvb (tr, adverb)
    1. to eat or drink
    2. to relish or delight in: he laps up old horror films
    3. to believe or accept eagerly and uncritically: he laps up tall stories
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    That is a surprise :eek:
    Agreed. It is strange that that is listed first. However, the appropriate definition is also there, furhter down the page. I would think that the OP would have learnt by now :))) to read through the whole definition thoroughly, and to check in more than dictionary before asking here.
    lap up:
    1. to take up (liquid) with the tongue: [~ + up + object]The cat lapped up her milk.[~ + object + up]The cat lapped it up.
    2. to receive enthusiastically: [~ + up + object]The actress lapped up the applause.[~ + object + up]She lapped it up.
    Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers:: lap/læp/vb (laps, lapping, lapped)
    1. (of small waves) to wash against (a shore, boat, etc), usually with light splashing sounds
    2. (often followed by up) (esp of animals) to scoop (a liquid) into the mouth with the tongue
     

    kansi

    Senior Member
    japanese
    Agreed. It is strange that that is listed first. However, the appropriate definition is also there, furhter down the page. I would think that the OP would have learnt by now :))) to read through the whole definition thoroughly, and to check in more than dictionary before asking here.
    It's hard to tell these are correct definitions and that was a wrong one unless I asked here..so a dictionary sometimes includes a wrong definition.
     

    Ponyprof

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    It's hard to tell these are correct definitions and that was a wrong one unless I asked here..so a dictionary sometimes includes a wrong definition.
    Yes.

    And if you rely on "concise" or free or "learner's" dictionaries, the chance is higher that you will have either a wrong definition, or the definitions (as here) in the wrong order of relevance.

    A cat or dog always drinks by lapping with its tongue. So the concept is related. But a cat and a person drink very differently.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    It's hard to tell these are correct definitions and that was a wrong one unless I asked here..so a dictionary sometimes includes a wrong definition.
    That's why I recommend using more than one dictionary in the first place - usually to see slightly different ways of giving a meaning and to reduce the (rare) risk of relying on one poor definition. It is also a good idea to review the threads at the bottom of each definition to learn from previous discussions. Those threads are a major asset and a big reason for why this siute was created in the first place: to overcome the limitations of dictionaries :eek:
     
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