Large mileage

  • prudent260

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    This one. It means he's driven a lot (and therefore for a large number of miles in total) in the course of each of various jobs.
    It's a funny sounding sentence, I agree.
    I've driven long miles all my adult life in a number of different occupations.
    What is the difference in meaning if I change it to long miles like the above sentence?

    Thank you for your prompt response.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    It doesn't sound a very natural sentence but if I heard it I'd assume that you found driving particularly hard for some reason and each mile seemed longer than it was.

    (A mile is a mile. A mile in one place isn't any longer than in another, but it could be more difficult.)
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I agree the sentence sounds a bit odd. But I can't think of a version that sounds good with only a small modification.:)
     
    Last edited:

    prudent260

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    It doesn't sound a very natural sentence but if I heard it I'd assume that you found driving particularly hard for some reason and each mile seemed longer than it was.

    (A mile is a mile. A mile in one place isn't any longer than in another, but it could be more difficult.)
    I agree the sentence sounds a bit odd. But I can't think of as version that sounds good with only a small modification.:)
    I have driven large mileages (a lot of mileages) all my adult life in a number of different occupations.
    I have driven a lot of miles all my adult life in a number of different occupations.

    Excuse me to have presented my question poorly.
    I feel mileage and mile are quite interchangeable here.
    What is the nuance?

    Thank you.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    I have driven large mileages all my adult life in a number of different occupations.
    I assume this means "per day". The writer has driven a large mileage per-day in (as part of) his occupation.

    The meaning is clear. The sentence is correct. All we may disagree with is style -- and this is not part of a "recommended style tutorial", it is a dictionary listing many different examples so you will understand the word "mileage".

    In AE most people would use a different pair of words:

    I have driven long distances as part of my job, all my adult life, in a number of different occupations.

    I feel mileage and mile are quite interchangeable here.
    What is the nuance?
    You cannot say "large miles" in place of "large mileage". "Mileage" can be replaced by "number of miles".
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    "I have driven large mileages all my adult life in a number of different occupations" is BE and is from Hansard1, which is corrected for errors.

    It is an interesting use as there is no time-scale given for what are repeated instances. I would understand it as 'annual mileages', and the speaker is saying that, most years he has driven a minimum of 25,000 miles, which in the UK is considered "large".

    1Hansard - Wikipedia
     
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