Laski

frenchlanguagelearner2

New Member
canada english
Hello,

I am wondering about someone who described me as a laski in Polish. Supposedly it is some kind of compliment but I have been unable to find the slang/translation online.
The only thing I have found is something about walking cane ?!

: )

Thank you!
 
  • jazyk

    Senior Member
    Brazílie, portugalština
    It must have something to do with Czech láska, love. Here's what I found:

    4. pot. «o bardzo zgrabnej, atrakcyjnej dziewczynie»

    It says: colloquial, related to a shapely, attractive girl.
     

    mcibor

    Senior Member
    Laska, szmula, fruzia are few of the names men give to attractive girls they don't know.
    Laska is the most common one, but to say the truth, all are rather taken badly by girls in Poland.
     

    jazyk

    Senior Member
    Brazílie, portugalština
    Laska, szmula, fruzia are few of the names men give to attractive girls they don't know.
    This is funny. It reminds me of Czech smůla (bad luck) and šmudla (a slovenly person, a slob).
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Laska, szmula, fruzia are few of the names men give to attractive girls they don't know.
    [...]
    I have never seen nor heard the last two. It looks like "szmula" is a regional cant, which would even comply... ;)

    Tom
     

    kknd

    Senior Member
    polski / Polish
    It's also used as a form of referring girlfriend(s) (or even female friends in a mock way) by guys. Nonetheless: I've never heard any body using it when referring to ugly or plain girl, this has some sexual connotations—the girl(s) is sexually attractive in someway—and the male is noticing it in this rough manner. :)
     

    skrypizas

    New Member
    Polish, English (United States)
    used as slang, "laski" is the plural form of "laska" which in english could be directly translated as a "babe" or good looking girl.

    literally it means "cane"
     

    mcibor

    Senior Member
    Yes, we from Szczecin started to reuse this word.

    BTW, once my Poznań friend's kids came crying from school saying "They are calling us ziomale ;("

    Ziomal, ziomek - kumpel - (eng: pal, guy)

    Whereas fruzia is not so much used, but can be heard in here
     

    mcibor

    Senior Member
    What is also quite interesting, there's also augmentative of word "laska". It's "lachon".

    xxx

    Strangely girls at my place of work usually just laugh, when being named lachon ;)
     
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    ryba

    Senior Member
    Laska referred to a human being means

    basically:
    1. an attractive girl/woman

    by extension:
    2. a girl/woman

    accompanied by a possessive:
    3. girlfriend.

    All of those are colloquial and belong rather to the male language although many girls use them too.

    Laska, szmula, fruzia are few of the names men give to attractive girls they don't know.
    Laska is the most common one, but to say the truth, all are rather taken badly by girls in Poland.

    The last two are regionalisms.;)

    I'm from Turek and I study in Poznań and had never heard any of them. Neither have my 3 friends (from Elbląg, Toruń and Poznań) I've just asked about it.

    What is also quite interesting, there's also augmentative of word "laska". It's "lachon".

    xxx

    Strangely girls at my place of work usually just laugh, when being named lachon ;)

    Hahahahahaha, yeah, that's right, the word has gotten quite popular with young people quite recently (at least in Poznań it has).

    Some girls find the word lachon even more reducing them to the fisical aspect than laska which is a classic but still in use now, maybe because it 1) has not gotten that lexicalized so it sounds more "shoking" 2) as it is an augmentative of laska it sounds more "brutal".:D

    I personally find lachon very funny just like many other slang words and expressions I use daily with my friends and it seems to me that most people also see it as something funny and thus fun to say, hahaha.

    My mum doesn't.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    I don't like the word lachon. [...]
    Same here. The reason is, at least in my case, that I associate it with another lacho- word, which definitely has got very negative connotations.

    On a related note, here in Warsaw also koza is also used to mean laska, I've only ever come across it in the first and second meanings given by ryba.

    Tom
     
    Same here. The reason is, at least in my case, that I associate it with another lacho- word, which definitely has got very negative connotations.

    I might not realize it before, but I think it's the same reason in my case too.
    On a related note, here in Warsaw also koza is also used to mean laska, I've only ever come across it in the first and second meanings given by ryba.

    Tom

    I'm sure we could still find more words to refer to a girl. Going on with the animal terminology, I'm positive some of you have come across foka (seal) as well as its diminutive form, foczka.
     

    ryba

    Senior Member
    I heard "lachon" some 12 years ago, form a friend who was some 45 years old at that time - if I remember well. But I agree, it's not very common.

    Poszukaj na YouTubie "Wyrywanie lachona" Kabaretu Moralnego Niepokoju.;)

    Same here. The reason is, at least in my case, that I associate it with another lacho- word, which definitely has got very negative connotations.

    What word??!! :eek:

    As far as I know, the only bad connotations one may have are related to the word "laska", not to "lachon". Apart from "laska" meaning 'cane' and things I wrote in the post above I have heard the word "laska" 1. referred to the penis and 2. referred to oral sex given to a man.

    That's why, as I said in #14, after all I prefer the word "lachon". In spite of being (originally) a little more rude than "laska" it may sound cheerful and is acceptable when it is clear you're just joking (remember that Poles love linguistic jokes; O.K., some girls don't:D). So, it is funnier.

    I would appreciate if you could say what kind of "lacho-" word you're talking about.:)

    Pozdrawiam.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Well, the word I was having in mind is lachociąg.
    I didn't want to use this word for obvious reasons and since I thought it was known well enough that everyone could guess what it was, but apparently it isn't. Curiously engough, when I come to think of it now it may be a regional slang.
     

    ryba

    Senior Member
    Well, the word I was having in mind is lachociąg.
    I didn't want to use this word for obvious reasons and since I thought it was known well enough that everyone could guess what it was, but apparently it isn't. Curiously engough, when I come to think of it now it may be a regional slang.

    Ojej. :eek:

    I had never heard it before, I don't know if people in Wielkopolska use it but I definitely haven't even heard anyone say it. W sumie, nie gadam o takich sprawach za często, a od postronnych nigdy do mnie to słowo nie doleciało.

    W każdym razie, dzięki, Tomku!
     

    kknd

    Senior Member
    polski / Polish
    As mentioned above basic meaning of laska is 'a cane' (0). Slang word laska in the meaning of 'a foxy girl' (1) has been probably deriven from other slang word laska meaning 'fellatio' (2); sticking to this ethymology one must assume that in the beginning (2) was used when referring to girls active sexually in this way and it's semantic field has expanded afterwards. Nonetheless one cannot deny (or can?) that (1) could induce (2) in meaning…

    Note: when dealing with laska in sense (2) semantic drift from (2) to (0) and vice versa is easily seen, where connection of (0) and (1) is not so straight-forward.
     

    BezierCurve

    Senior Member
    Now I remember a word "girlaski", met for the first time in a Polish book writtne in fifties/sixties... That was what they called girls dancing in some cheap club, as far as i remember.
     

    Gochna

    Senior Member
    I found your discussion very interesting. As a pretty (and modest :p) girl I've heard lots of words describing good-looking women, but I must admit that I've never come across "szmula" or "fruzia"...
    I wouldn't use "laska" although I don't find it offensive in any way, and I use "lachon" a lot talking to my girl friends.
    I haven't understood the "lacho-.." word either... Maybe in Poznan (where I did my studies) and Łódź (where I lived for some time ) it is not used... or my male friends never dare to use it where I am around.
    Thanks for your posts anyway, learned a lot :)
     

    mcibor

    Senior Member
    In Szczecin, where I come from, word szmula is quite popular. And fruzia is not used (I never heard it on streat), but is understood thanks to hip hop singer Łona.

    Lachociąg is known to me, and refers only to men, from what I know. Is very obtrusive.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    [..]
    I haven't understood the "lacho-.." word either... Maybe in Poznan (where I did my studies) and Łódź (where I lived for some time ) it is not used... or my male friends never dare to use it where I am around.
    Thanks for your posts anyway, learned a lot :)
    Come to think of it if I heard the word, then it was always in only male company. I have never heard it when a woman was about.

    [...]
    Lachociąg is known to me, and refers only to men,[...]
    Hm... here it denotes only a woman. I have never heard it used to denote a man.

    Tom
     

    ryba

    Senior Member
    So, let's talk about the gender...

    Hm... here it denotes only a woman. I have never heard it used to denote a man.
    I don't know any lachociąg but I think the word's structure doesn't indicate which sex it should be referred to. I depends more on the person and their sexual orientation I guess.:rolleyes:

    Curiously enough, I have heard the word lachon referred to a man (!). Semantically, there is no inconvenience in it as lachon is a masculine word.

    I have also heard a masculine version of laska. Some girls say lasek. By "some" I mean two or three friends of mine, I don't think it is a wide-spread use, it is more of another linguistic play people invent.

    Pozdrawiam.
     

    e7ka

    Member
    Polish - English
    In Poland boys sometimes call 'laska' when they see a girl clothed like a prostitude, so in some situations it is not a compliment. It depends on way in which they say that word. If they shout it out or call it out swashbucklingly it is certainly not a compliment.

    Sometimes friend call to his girlfriends "hey laski" and in this situation it means just hi but in a funny and not insulting way.
    So it is all about to whom and how you say the word 'laska'
     

    ryba

    Senior Member
    In Poland boys sometimes call 'laska' when they see a girl clothed like a prostitude, so in some situations it is not a compliment. It depends on way in which they say that word. If they shout it out or call it out swashbucklingly it is certainly not a compliment.
    I have never heard (of) such a usage and I have never heard the word "laska" used in vocative, except for the plural "laski".
    I think it is simply slang for "girl" and, being slang it may sound less respectful, just that.

    Sometimes friend call to his girlfriends "hey laski" and in this situation it means just hi but in a funny and not insulting way.
    So it is all about to whom and how you say the word 'laska'
    :thumbsup:

    I have just seen a comment made on one of my friend's photos on one of the Polish social networking websites: Ale z Ciebie lachon!!! The comment was made by her sister.
    Właśnie takie użycie uważam za naturalne (czyli wobec kogoś mniej lub bardziej bliskiego i z lekką nutką frywolności/żartu).:)
     
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    e7ka

    Member
    Polish - English
    As we can see it depence on situation and circumscription. More often I've heard that word in negative meaning. And that word is very useful if it's going about (for example) boozers and skates.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    So, let's talk about the gender...


    I don't know any lachociąg but I think the word's structure doesn't indicate which sex it should be referred to. I depends more on the person and their sexual orientation I guess.:rolleyes:[...]
    There's also convention which makes the denotation rather unequivocal and other usages as accidental or simply strange if used outside the context. Mind you I wasn't referring to the grammatical gender at all.



    In Poland boys sometimes call 'laska' when they see a girl clothed like a prostitude, so in some situations it is not a compliment. It depends on way in which they say that word. If they shout it out or call it out swashbucklingly it is certainly not a compliment.
    [...]
    I have never heard (of) such a usage and I have never heard the word "laska" used in vocative, [...]
    I think it is simply slang for "girl" and, being slang it may sound less respectful, just that.
    I concur. In such a situation, I wouldn't be surprised to hear the word I am discussing above with Ryba.


    Tom
     

    janek

    Member
    Polish, Poland
    "Laska" has become increasingly neutral, and is usually said with appreciation, meaning shapely, good looking girl or woman. Of course, it's far from being Queen's Polish :). Sometimes, however, it might just substitute "girl" or "gal", for example when used in vocative plural, also by women (it's still highly informal), like this phrase I've heard from a middle-aged woman who spoke to a bunch of similarly aged friends in a disco:

    Laski, jedziemy do domu.
    Girls, let's go home.

    I haven't heard the word "laski" in negative meaning for a very long time, unless it's used as a taunt, but in such context any word can have a derogatory meaning.
     
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