last stop/final destination

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jiamajia

Senior Member
Mandarin
Shanghai Subway uses Chinese and English billingual for announcement. For the last stop of a line service, it announces: next is the final destination, which sounds odd to me.

Am I too fussy?
 
  • Askalon

    Senior Member
    English (US)
    It sounds fine to me. I would prefer the phrase "last stop" or "final stop" just because "final destination" reminds me of the movies (I think they're movies... I've never actually seen them). But either wording is fine.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    "Final destination," to me, means where I ultimately want to go on this trip: my home, a friend's home, an office, a store. My destination is unlikely to be a subway stop, even one at the end of a line. I am almost certain to continue my trip by bus, by taxi, by some other means of transportation, or on foot.

    I have heard this phrase used in a similar way on flights, where a cabin crew member, on welcoming us to an airport, often says something like "If Chicago is your final destination, you may collect your checked baggage on Carousel 3." (Presumably some passengers will connect to other flights.) It's a bit softer than the usage you cite because it considers all of Chicago, and presumably its surroundings, to be part of the destination - not just the airport. Still, it's similar, so perhaps the usage you found isn't that bad.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    It's the final destination of the train that is being referred to. Often, however, the same phrase is used for travellers, hence the mental clash of meanings.
     

    Scholiast

    Senior Member
    Strictly, "Final destination" is a tautology.

    A "destination" is by definition the place at which a journey ends, and there can be no destination before that, any more than a woman can be "a bit pregnant".

    Of course a passenger's destination may not be the same as that of the train or aeroplane she or he is travelling on:

    "This train's destination is Glasgow, but I'm only going to Birmingham"
    "This plane's destination is Newark, but I am flying on [from there] to Phoenix"
     
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