"last", " valid"...

roniy

Senior Member
ISRAEL: Fluent Hebrew ( Speak Russian, Learning English)
Does these 2 sentences correct and means the same ???

"How long is this metro card valid ?"
"How long does this metro card last ?"

I want to ask like until when I can use this card ...
If you have any other way to say that please write it here ....

Thank you all ,
Roni.
 
  • JLanguage

    Senior Member
    USA: American English, Learning Hebrew and Spanish
    roniy said:
    Does these 2 sentences correct and means the same ???

    "How long is this metro card valid for ?" correct
    "How long does this metro card last for ?" ("last" is ambiguous here)

    I want to ask like until when I can use this card ...
    If you have any other way to say that please write it here ....

    Thank you all ,
    Roni.

    Colloquially I would say:
    "When does this metro card expire?"
    or
    "How long is this metro card good for?"
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    hi - I think this is a case where USA and UK phrasing might vary.

    In England I can't think I've ever heard "expire" used as a verb with a travel card. It is often used with credit cards, as they have "expiry date" printed on them!

    I would be happy with "last for" for the metro ticket
     

    badgrammar

    Senior Member
    American English
    Hmmmm.

    Maybe "expire" is more commonly used for something that has a definite time/date limit, after which it is no longer usable.

    Valid is along the same lines as expire, but it does not necessarily refer to a time frame. For example, if your passport has been tampered with or damaged, it may no longer be valid, even if it has not expired. Likewise, if it has expired, it is no longer a valid passport.

    And "last" seems more like something that has a definite duration, an inevitable end, but gives the idea of "using something all up"... not so much an imposed expiry date, but rather the moment when all of what was available (units on a metro card, for example) will have been consumed.

    Two sentences that make this point:

    How long does this card last?

    Is this metro card still valid?

    When does this metro card expire?


    But hey, we would have understood each of your first two entences just fine!

    "Does these 2 sentences correct and means the same ???"

    Little correction: "Are these 2 sentences correct and do they mean the same (thing)?

    :)
     

    nycphotography

    Senior Member
    American English
    suzi br said:
    hi - I think this is a case where USA and UK phrasing might vary.

    In England I can't think I've ever heard "expire" used as a verb with a travel card. It is often used with credit cards, as they have "expiry date" printed on them!

    I would be happy with "last for" for the metro ticket

    I think its due to the nature of the metro card itself.

    There are two kinds: unlimited use for a time window, and a set number of trips and it doesnt matter when you take them (within say a year).

    For the former, the questions are:

    When does it expire? (assuming it has already been "activated" or "used" the first time).

    and How long is it good for? (if its time window hasn't been started yet)

    For the latter, the question is "How many rides are left?"

    In Hong Kong (octopus card), it has a dollar (HK) balance. so the question would be "How much (credit/money/balance) is left (on it)?"
     
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