Later on and the dance floor is filled

VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
Taking her up to dance he looks at the area in front of the seat and, relieved that the shoe isn't to be seen, continues dancing with her as the other guests watch. Later on and the dance floor is filled people.
'Roman Holiday', script

"Later on and (a clause)".
I'm confused by "and" following 'later on'.

After a while (and) the dance floor is filled people.
After some time (and) the dance floor is filled people.
Some time later (and) the dance floor is filled people.

All the three sentences sound idiomatic both with "and" and without? Maybe one is more formal than the other?
Thanks.
 
  • VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    No, Vik. I meant "needless". "Needless" = "unnecessary". There is no good reason for using "and" in that sentence that I can see.
    So, if it's not awkward, then it's a literary style, something that is not used in everyday speech, right?
    I feel I look meticulous.:)
     
    Last edited:

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Bear in mind that this is a script, a set of directions for the people working on a film, not a work intended for publication. The niceties of grammar aren't really important in this context. I take it to be a sort of shorthand for: In the next scene, it's later on in the evening, and the dance floor is filled with people.
     
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