later on

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bepleased

Banned
Chinese
Hi,

In "It was not until later on that we relized she had gone."

my question is asking you the ellipsis after "on".

In me, it is "her going", but I don't know whether it is correct?

Thank your help.


bepleased
 
  • bepleased

    Banned
    Chinese
    In "It was not until later on that we relized she had gone."

    I am sorry that I confuse my meaning.

    My question is what is the ellipsis after "later on".

    Whether is the whole way "later on her going"?

    Thank you.
     

    bluegiraffe

    Senior Member
    English - England
    OK, so I looked up ellipsis in the dictionary as I'm not a linguist and it seems you are asking me what is missing after the word "on". Nothing is missing. "Later on" is a fixed expression meaning "Later".
     

    Tiggie7384

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    Yes "later on" is a fixed expression, however, you could ellaborate it to say:

    It was not until later on in the day/in the morning/that afternoon/that night/in the evening that we realised she had gone.
     

    bepleased

    Banned
    Chinese
    As with your telling, however, what does "on" mean?

    Does'nt "on" mean "directly after and often as a result of" and "used to introduce a background unto <later>"?

    Doesn't "on" leave merely a "on"?
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    Later on means "a later time". There is no ellipsis because "later on", here, works as a unit and is independent of a prepositional phrase. In other words it is different to "later on that day", where "on" is a preposition.

    The phrase is indeterminate; the actual time of the realization is not important. The important thing is that the realization did not occur at the time of the event referred to--it happened later.

    It's similar to the "on" in some phrasal verbs, such as "drag on" meaning to last much longer than is tolerable. Here, again, "on" is not a preposition (in fact this verb does not take an object).
     

    Tiggie7384

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    the free online dictionary says "on" means lots of things, but in respect to your question 4.b. is the answer - check out this link for many more meanings with examples - http://www.thefreedictionary.com/on

    adv. ...
    4. a. Toward or at a point lying ahead in space or time; forward: The play moved on to the next city.
    b. At or to a more distant point in time or space: I'll do it later on. :D

    ...
     

    Adam Cruge

    Banned
    India & Bengali
    I was reading a thread and came across this sentence:
    "It was not until later on that we realized she had gone."

    What is the meaning of "until later on" here?
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Driven

    Senior Member
    USA/English
    We didn't realize until later on.... means we didn't know it at the time but some time in the future (of that moment but now in the past) we realized it. Until later on in the day, week, year - sometime in the future.
     

    Adam Cruge

    Banned
    India & Bengali
    But the above sentence: "It was not until later on that we realized she had gone."
    means that we realized it immediately that she had gone.
     

    jpyvr

    Senior Member
    English - Canadian
    No, it means at some later time, NOT immediately after she went. That is the purpose of "until later on" - it indicates a passage of time between her leaving and the realization of the others that she had gone.
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    Moderator note:

    I have merged the threads. This is the same topic, so the discussion should have been continued on the existing thread instead of starting a new one.
     

    Adam Cruge

    Banned
    India & Bengali
    Can't see the logic behind it.
    "It was until later on that we realized she had gone." = It means she had been gone for some time before we noticed that she was not there.

    This is all right. But notice the "not" in the original sentence after "It was ....."
     

    Driven

    Senior Member
    USA/English
    The "not" really goes with the "until". It was "not until" some future time, that we realized. You could say, "it was not until tomorrow that we realized..." or "it was not until an hour later" or whatever. Or you could put the negative at the beginning if it makes it more clear. We did not realize -- until later on.
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    Can't see the logic behind it.
    "It was until later on that we realized she had gone." = It means she had been gone for some time before we noticed that she was not there.

    This is all right. But notice the "not" in the original sentence after "It was ....."
    No it isn't all right. If you use "until" here you must use the negative: in fact the purpose of "until" is to create a limit before which something was not done (or known, etc.). It actually allows the negative.

    However, if you leave out "until" it is fine, there is no negative:
    "It was later on that we realized she had gone."
    The point of the topic sentence, though, is to emphasize that there was no realization at the time of the event.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I suggest that anywhere you see "later on" you could simply say "later" without changing the meaning and without sounding strange. I can sense no additional meaning due to the addition of "on".

    You cannot always replace "later" with "later on".
     
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