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Jean Francoix

Banned
french/Belgium
Hello,

We got cut off so I will call you later on this evening.

Is this decent English ? Did I make any mistakes ?

Thank you,

Jean Francoix
 
  • difficult cuss

    Senior Member
    English England
    Another way of putting it would be "we were cut off", as "got" is the past tense of "get" which means "to receive". Although "got" is used often in UK English, it is not "perfect" by any means.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    If the question refers to a telephone conversation....we can only assume something, because you haven't bothered to tell us... then it is common colloquial speech. It is perfectly acceptable and understandable in AE.

    If your question is about something other than a telephone connection, we can waste time guessing.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Another way of putting it would be "we were cut off", as "got" is the past tense of "get" which means "to receive". Although "got" is used often in UK English, it is not "perfect" by any means.
    So, "we went out drinking last night and got drunk" is incorrect English, in your opinion? "Got" does not only mean "received." It also means "became."

    [edit]

    Sorry,that sounded more crabby than I meant it. It might be a BE/AE difference, but I think in AE "got cut off" refers to a specific incident at a specific point in time, while "were cut off" can be an extended period of time. For example, "we were in the process of changing lanes when we got cut off by a speed demon in a Hummer" vs. "the bridge was washed out by the storm, and the island's residents were cut off from the mainland for three days."
     

    difficult cuss

    Senior Member
    English England
    Acceptable and understandable but not perfect. In any circumstance (on the telephone or seperated by a tide etc), to follow "got" with "cut" would always be colloquial. So, if Jean-Francois needs to write this in a business communication (or anything other than an informal note), he should write "we were". One can assume that he does need to write it otherwise he would be back on the telephone and not need to make the future arrangement...or so it would seem to me. Incidently, the use of "common" alongside "colloquial" would seem superfluous as both mean "informal".
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Incidently, the use of "common" alongside "colloquial" would seem superfluous as both mean "informal".
    Colloquial speech can be quite rare, confined only to one small region of a country. :) We recently had a thread with "I need my watch repairing", which is apparently a construction that is often heard in Northwestern England but nowhere else.

    I will be re-thinking my idea of "got cut off" today. I am not sure whether it's colloquial English that is so common I have adopted it as allowable as "decent" English, or if it's simply a difference in "flavors" of English. Thanks for bringing it up.
     
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