Latinx

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  • ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    Thanx Thanks! Somehow (although I'd never heard of it before either), I'm not surprised that someone seeking the utimate in non-sexist language came up with Mx for Mr/Ms. :rolleyes:
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    1) It's omnipresent now.
    2) It's pronounced "La-TEEN-ex".
    My Apple IPad has a "news" app built in. It has news stories from many sources. I've seen Latinx in stories about Trumps misadventures with white supremacy.

    It does not feel like a spoken language formation. It sounds like someone writing tried to eliminate the "latina/latino" gender specific wording. I understood it in context. It might catch on.

    Latina, Latino, Latinx. What is this new term, Latinx? - Region IV-W Post

    atinx is a gender neutral term that is being used as a means of being more inclusive and moving away from the gendered term. It is pronounced “Lah-teen-ex”, and allows for the Spanish language to move beyond gender binaries.

    "Gendered term". "Gender" is a verb? Merriam-Webster lists it as a verb for "engender", but not for "gender" as used here.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - US
    It is now quite common in many contexts and ubiquitous in academia.
    Extreme-left politics is ubiquitous in US academia. That doesn't reflect the US in general. It definitely does not reflect the US Hispanic population in general.

    If a new word becomes generally used (in the US, not in academia), of course I will use it. That has already happened with "Ms." and with "they". It is too soon to know if it will happen with "latinx".
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    It can't be that ubiquitous because I've never heard it (granted I went cold turkey on reading news websites about three years ago).

    Ubiquitous in academia is a whole different situation than ubiquitous in society. Lots of terms are common in the hothouse world of academia that are not common elsewhere.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Some consistency is in order... :)

    I've read it a few times, but certainly never heard anyone say it.
     
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    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Some consistency is in order... :)

    I've read it a few times, but certainly never heard anyone say it.
    Perhaps it is more widely used in south Texas, New Mexico and southern California, areas with a larger Latino presence.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Perhaps it is more widely used in south Texas, New Mexico and southern California, areas with a larger Latino presence.
    I grew up in New Mexico, I have lived in southern California, and I live in Texas now. As mentioned above, it's not primarily the people themselves that are using it. It's academics and some "serious" journalists primarily.
     

    WyomingSue

    Senior Member
    English--USA
    Latinx is a gender neutral term that is being used as a means of being more inclusive and moving away from the gendered term. It is pronounced “Lah-teen-ex”, and allows for the Spanish language to move beyond gender binaries.
    I think in Spanish it would have to be pronounced la-teen-ek-ees, so it looks like Spanglish to me. What is the article? Couldn't be las or los, so maybe lxs latinx? Ridiculous creation of people who aren't using the word in a Spanish sentence.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I think in Spanish it would have to be pronounced la-teen-ek-ees, so it looks like Spanglish to me. What is the article? Couldn't be las or los, so maybe lxs latinx? Ridiculous creation of people who aren't using the word in a Spanish sentence.
    But if the "x" or more likely the "+" was written over the "o" in Latino, then it is not really language related. I am suggesting the "+" as it, along with a large circle is the sign of a female (male is the circle with an arrow). If that is in fact the source for Latinx, then it is cultural and not language in origin.

    I think it is more likely that someone protesting the use of "Latino" would use the + and not the x.
     
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