Latvian: Dāvāja Māriņa meitiņai mūžiņu

Flaminius

coclea mod
日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
Dear Latvian speakers on this forum,

Could I get help with translating the song, composed by Raimonds Pauls? I have managed my ways through the first two stanzas and the refrain but the third stanza is hardly possible for me to translate. Here is the part of the lyric from a lyric list.

1. Kā aizmirsies, aizmirsies
2. Man viss jau dienu rūpestos!
3. Līdz piepeši, piepeši
4. No pārsteiguma satrūkstos,

I recognise some words including
aizmirsies (feminine p.p. for reflexive "forget"), dienu (genitive plural of "day") and dzirdu (1st sg. past? of "hear") but have difficulty in putting together what few words I understand.

Any hints are appreciated.
Flaminius
 
  • karuna

    Senior Member
    Latvian, Latvia
    I can try to give a verbatim translation to this. It is above my head to provide any poetic translation but I guess the meaning will become clear. If you still need more help, let me know.

    1. Kā aizmirsies, aizmirsies
    How was forgotten, forgotten
    2. Man viss jau dienu rūpestos!
    By me everything in days' worries
    3. Līdz piepeši, piepeši
    Until sudenly, sudenly
    4. No pārsteiguma satrūkstos,
    From surprise [I become] startled

    Actually I also couldn't understand the meaning of this excerpt very well without the context.

    Jo dzirdu es, dzirdu es,
    Because I hear, I hear
    Kā pati savā nodabā
    How herself on her own
    Čukst klusiņām, klusiņām
    Wisper softly, softly
    Jau mana meita smaidot tā:
    Already my daughter smiling thus:

    Tā gāja laiks, gāja laiks,
    Thus the time went, the time went
    Un nu jau mātes līdzās nav.
    And already the mother is not by her side.
    Vien pašai man, pašai man
    just me myself, me myself
    Ar visu jātiek galā jau,
    With everything must deal already
    Bet brīžos tais, brīžos tais,
    But in those moments, in those moments
    Kad sirds smeldz sāpju rūgtumā,
    When the heart aches in pains' sorrow
    Es pati sev, pati sev,
    I to myself, to myself
    Tad pasmējusies saku tā:
    Then, having laughed, tell thus:
     

    Flaminius

    coclea mod
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    Karuna, ļoti paldies! I have almost given up on getting an answer on this forum. Welcome to WordReference and thank you again.

    I would like to clarify the following line:
    karuna said:
    Un nu jau mātes līdzās nav.
    And already the mother is not by her side.

    I understand "mātes līdzās" is literally mother's side, mother standing in genitive (of) and side in nominative (subject case). I first thought the line meant, "I am not at mother's side" but the third person present negative of būt (nav) makes that interpretation impossible.

    Could you advise what is the subject and what it is doing (or not doing)?
     

    karuna

    Senior Member
    Latvian, Latvia
    Flaminius said:
    I understand "mātes līdzās" is literally mother's side, mother standing in genitive (of) and side in nominative (subject case). I first thought the line meant, "I am not at mother's side" but the third person present negative of būt (nav) makes that interpretation impossible.
    Although līdzās means by side, it is not a noun but pre/postposition that takes a noun in dative case. Here the pronoun (1st person) is implied[man] līdzās - by my side.

    The subject is mātes which is in genitive because of the negative verb nav. I have never thought about the grammar of my native language and I am surprised that the subject can be in genitive but there is no doubt about it. Such genitive + nav constructions are very popular: man nav naudas — I don't have money [me doesn't exist money].

    I hope this helps. Have to run now...
     

    Flaminius

    coclea mod
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    Tu esi lieliska, Karuna! Just to confirm, on what conditions does genitive + nav construction come into use? I realise your second example, "man nav naudas" marks the subject by dative (for me, cash does not exist). Is genitive + nav construction called for when the subject is a noun, and dative construction when the subject is a pronoun?
     

    karuna

    Senior Member
    Latvian, Latvia
    Flaminius said:
    Tu esi lieliska, Karuna! Just to confirm, on what conditions does genitive + nav construction come into use? I realise your second example, "man nav naudas" marks the subject by dative (for me, cash does not exist). Is genitive + nav construction called for when the subject is a noun, and dative construction when the subject is a pronoun?
    Hmm. A very difficult question ;) Even some native speakers will use nominative case in the above mentioned example instead of genitive. It seems different in some dialects, but for me, coming from Cēsis rajons where the middle dialect is spoken, nominative simply doesn't sound right. However, the genitive usage here is not governed by an object in dative at all. My grammar book Latviešu valodas praktiskā gramatika by B. Ceplīte says:

    13. Tas, no kā izriet darbības vārda nosauktā darbība, stāvoklis (pieverba subjekta ģenitīvs). Šādā nozīmē ģenitīvs lietojams saistījumā ar darbības vārdiem nebūt, trūkt, netrūkt, pietikt, nepietikt: nav sniega; trūkst drosmes; netrūkst izejvielu; pietiek līdzekļu; nepietiek spēka.
    I don't really understand what this clever definition means but it can be roughly translated as: That from which arises the action or state indicated by the verb (???). In this meaning the genitive is used when connecting with the following verbs: to not be, to be lacking, to not be lacking, to be enough, to not be enough.

    Most interesting thing here is that while genitive is used with both trūkt and netrūkt, it isonly used with the negative verb nebūt: zēns ir skolā (the boy (nominative) is at school), whereas: nē, zēna skolā nav! (no, the boy (genitive) is not at school! – nav comes at end for emphasis). Though it doesn't apply when the verb nebūt is used predicatively: skola nav liela (the school is not big).

    By the way, Flaminius, are you studying Latvian? It must be very interesting thing to do.
     
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