Lavado Quirúrgico de Lesiones

Memorxa

New Member
English- USA
Hi, I'm new here so hopefully I posted this under the correct category. Anyways I'm trying to translate a medical report for my job, but I'm really stuck with the words " Lavado Quirurgico." Online translators say it means surgical scrub, but I wanted to make sure I don't translate incorrectly or confuse the context. The full sentence is:

"Se le realiza Lavado Quirurgico de Lesiones por Proyectil por Arma de Fuego."

Any help would be greatly appreciated!

Moderator's note
The title should contain the word or phrase to be translated.
Thank you
Bevj
 
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  • LVRBC

    Senior Member
    English-US, standard and medical
    Surgical irrigation is one way to say it. Surgical lavage is another. Surgical scrub refers to the elaborate wash done by surgeons on their own hands and wrists before gloving. You cannot use this term for treatment of gunshot wounds.
    There is a medical terminology section of the forum. Your question should be the title of your post.
     

    Memorxa

    New Member
    English- USA
    Ah, my apologies. I'll be more careful with that next time. But thank you so much for your help!
     

    EricEnfermero

    Senior Member
    US - English
    I work with babies and not gunshot wound patients, but when we have a patient who undergoes an exploratory laparotomy, the baby will often have subsequent surgical procedures known as "abdominal washouts." I don't know how commonly used that is in the adult surgical world, but maybe someone with more experience can weigh in.
     

    ChemaSaltasebes

    Senior Member
    Castellano (España)
    I believe "lavado quirúrgico (de lesiones o heridas)" [as gunshot wounds, open fracture wounds, etc]., refers to wound irrigation and debridement.
     

    AbogadoPeter

    Senior Member
    English - USA (medical & legal)
    " Lavado Quirurgico." Online translators say it means surgical scrub
    I agree with LVRBC in #2.

    I believe "lavado quirúrgico (de lesiones o heridas)" [as gunshot wounds, open fracture wounds, etc]., refers to wound irrigation and debridement.
    In my opinion, "irrigation" yes, "debridement" not so much.

    Debridement generally refers to the removal of devitalized, non-viable or likely non-viable tissue from a wound. Irrigation is a nonselective process that attempts to wash away anything that is not fixed to tissue or to a structure in the wound or surgical field, while debridement is the selective (and generally surgical) removal of specific tissues.
     

    ChemaSaltasebes

    Senior Member
    Castellano (España)
    I agree, Peter. Anyhow, in Spanish at least, we do talk about lavado/limpieza (de heridas) referring to wound irrigation. Generally, whenever we specify lavado/limpiza quirúrgica (de herida) -in a non-surgical set like the ER- we refer not just to wound irrigation but also to wound edge care (mechanical debridement). The OP's context is most probably a surgical one; wound debridement here does seem to be even more reasonably included within the concept of lavado/limpieza quirúrgica (de la herida), although as suggested wound irrigation / wound washouts (whithin a surgical context) could well be a fair translation. It would be interesting to read through the original text...
     

    AbogadoPeter

    Senior Member
    English - USA (medical & legal)
    I agree that context would be helpful. Of course, you would know your local practice better than I would.

    Intuitively, I would think that the term "limpieza de la herida" would allow for irrigation, surgical debridement and mechanical removal of foreign materials, as indicated.

    A brief Google search of "lavado quirúrgico" (omitting references to hand scrub and skin prep) suggested to me that many sources differentiated between "lavado" and "desbridamiento", but I'm sure that there is a lot of variation depending on geography, practice and clinical setting.

    Without further context, I would opt for something like irrigation, washout or lavage.
     

    Memorxa

    New Member
    English- USA
    I agree, Peter. Anyhow, in Spanish at least, we do talk about lavado/limpieza (de heridas) referring to wound irrigation. Generally, whenever we specify lavado/limpiza quirúrgica (de herida) -in a non-surgical set like the ER- we refer not just to wound irrigation but also to wound edge care (mechanical debridement). The OP's context is most probably a surgical one; wound debridement here does seem to be even more reasonably included within the concept of lavado/limpieza quirúrgica (de la herida), although as suggested wound irrigation / wound washouts (whithin a surgical context) could well be a fair translation. It would be interesting to read through the original text...
    Unfortunately I'm not allowed to display the whole report, but maybe this might clarify things? My apologies if it doesn't, as the report itself is not super detailed. To my understanding, there was some diagnostics done for any internal organ damage, followed by some sort of irrigation operation afterwards (possibly to clean the internal organs of any debris). And I've noticed that specific term being used in medical reports from Mexico and El Salvador:

    "Se pasa a sala de operaciones para realizar Lavado Peritoneal diagnostico el cual se reporta negativo a lesion de organos internos y se le realiza Lavado Quirurgico de Lesiones por Proyectil por Arma de Fuego."
     

    AbogadoPeter

    Senior Member
    English - USA (medical & legal)
    It's still an open question. On the one hand, has Chema says, it would be logical that they would perform both irrigation and debridement on a gunshot wound... although they might have chosen not to do anything so additionally invasive at that point.

    On the other hand, "lavado peritoneal diagnóstico" is diagnostic peritoneal lavage. Strictly following parallel usage, "lavado quirúrgico" would reasonably be surgical wound irrigation. It could also be lavage, but that usage is less common in that context, in my experience. I associate "lavage" more often with washing out a cavity or hollow organ (gastric lavage, bronchoalveolar lavage, peritoneal lavage). I don't know what terminology they use in British-influenced countries.
     
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