Lawrence <loomed far larger> in their consciousness

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longxianchen

Senior Member
chinese
Hi,
The following is from a speech video of Oxford University(episode one, Lawrence's relationship to consciousness) by Dr Catherine Brown, talking about Lawrence:
(background: the beginning of this episode……)

So you all have the pleasure of being 40 years behind the times. 1970 might have been before your parents and after your parents were at secondary school. But ask members of either of the generations above and you may well find that Lawrence loomed far larger in their consciousness when they were your age than he does in yours now.


As far as I know, loom is derogatory, and large here means deeply/greatly. But to make this sentence easier to understand, what word can replace loom please?

Thank you in advance
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    "Loom" here really isn't negative. The whole phrase means that they spent more time thinking about Lawrence, that Lawrence was more important to them than he is to younger people.
     

    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    Thank you so much. Now I know loom is not necessarily derogatory/negative, even though dictionaries define it negatively.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    The definition of a "large, indistinct presence" is more common in the WR dictionary. For my generation which is the one she's talking about Lawrence was a gigantic and very distinct presence! If for no other reason than the trial of the publishers in 1960, although in fact we had all read the book in our teens as the major source of information about sex.
     
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