lay down case

JAM-JAM

Senior Member
Bonjour,

Voici d'abord la réplique qui me donne des difficultés:

"It gets some expectations that this isn’t some lay down case that the state is going to come in and roll over this guy. There are other suspects out there and it’s lots of intrigue and all that".

On parle ici d'un procès où un homme (this guy) est accusé d'avoir tué sa femme. L'avocat de l'homme affirme que son client est innocent et propose 4 autres suspects. Toute fois, la personne qui dit cette phrase (le juge de cet ancien procès) sait déjà que le mari est bien le meurtrier.

Quelqu'un peut m'aider à traduire cette phrase?

Merci!
 
  • JAM-JAM

    Senior Member
    C'est dans un documentaire sur un procès. C'est le juge de ce procès qui dit cela. Il explique que ce procès allait être médiatisé, je crois qu'il parle des attentes du public. "lay down case", c'est quoi??
     

    WME

    Senior Member
    French-France
    I know it's late but I'm getting there for future references.

    Well it does seem that a "lay down case" (usually three words) is an often used phrase to refer to a case that shouldn't prove difficult to solve, where one party is very obviously guilty.

    So here, I would say that "Il y a quelque attente qu'il ne s'agisse pas là d'un procès gagné d'avance dans lequel ce gars va se faire rouler dessus par l'Etat. Il y a d'autres suspects dans la nature, beaucoup d'intrigues, etc."
     

    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    What a coincidence! I've just read a story titled "The Lay Down Case For Charging Trump (And Others) with Conspiring To Defraud The US" (on the website Daily Kos, bylined KeithDB):

    "Today on Morning Joe [a TV program], Bob Woodward and Bob Costas said a Republican former head of the Criminal Division of the Department of Justice told them that based on just what was already known, there is a "lay down case" under 18 U.S.C. §371 and goes on to explain why."

    I think that indicates that the case is so solid and clear that the defendant can only "lay (sic) down" and accept that the court will rule in favor of the plaintiff (although of course the defendant will plead 'Not Guilty' and appeal the verdict and try to drag out the process as long as possible).

    Hope this helps; I'll leave it to the FR natives to suggest translations!
     
    Last edited:

    WME

    Senior Member
    French-France
    What a coincidence! I've just read a story titled "The Lay Down Case For Charging Trump (And Others) with Conspiring To Defraud The US" (on the website Daily Kos, bylined KeithDB):

    "Today on Morning Joe [a TV program], Bob Woodward and Bob Costas said a Republican former head of the Criminal Division of the Department of Justice told them that based on just what was already known, there is a "lay down case" under 18 U.S.C. §371 and goes on to explain why."

    I think that indicates that the case is so solid and clear that the defendant can only "lay (sic) down" and accept that the court will rule in favor of the plaintiff (although of course the defendant will plead 'Not Guilty' and appeal the verdict and try to drag out the process as long as possible).

    Hope this helps; I'll leave it to the FR natives to suggest translations!

    Ahaha,

    Yes many sources coming up these days reminding us about this particular phrase do seem to refer to the same news.
    They brought me here too !

    And on social media, there's usually a string of replies after the news post with natives asking what in the world a "lay down case" means !

    ;)
     
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