lay something (out) on someone

Paulfromitaly

MODerator
Italian
Hello,

Another Starsky & Hutch episode.

A Hutch's girl friend has been dating a guy who is actually a thug.
There's growing evidence that he's involved in the murder of a cop, but Hutch doesn't want to admit his friend picked the wrong guy.

Hutch: You know something, Starsky, sometimes you have the most irritating quality.

Starsky: Don’t lay that out on me, how do you think I feel. She’s your friend.
Does the part in bold mean " don't take it out on me" or does it mean something slightly different?

Thank you
 
  • Meadsie

    Member
    English
    Hi Paul

    It depends. It could well mean exactly what you wrote, or, depending on whatever Starsky said to have Hutch reply like that, it could interpreted slightly differently to mean:

    'don't blame me'...
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    It's the sort of phrase that sounds idiomatic and may not ever have been widely used, ... but I would associate it with the notion of laying responsibility or blame on someone else. In this case he's saying "Don't try to shift the attention to me, you're the one with the problem here".
     

    Paulfromitaly

    MODerator
    Italian
    Thank you.
    Hutch is in denial: he won't admit his friend's boyfriend is suspect number one.
    Starsky is trying to persuade him that, being police officers, they must check out also this guy's alibi and not just take his word for it.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I think you heard it wrong; I think it was probably "Don't lay that on me"--not "don't lay that out".

    "Don't lay that on me" is an informal/slang phrase meaning "don't blame me", "don't put the blame on me", "don't hold me responsible" for that.
     

    Paulfromitaly

    MODerator
    Italian
    I think you heard it wrong; I think it was probably "Don't lay that on me"--not "don't lay that out".

    "Don't lay that on me" is an informal/slang phrase meaning "don't blame me", "don't put the blame on me", "don't hold me responsible" for that.
    I found the script (written by an English speaker..) and it backs up what I heard.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    It is still very likely something misheard- the most common phrase can be found here without the "out".
    G**gle finds 5 hits for "Don't lay that out on me" (one of them is this thread) and over 8,000 for "Don't lay that on me"!
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    What is the source of the script?

    I can imagine "Don't lay that out on me" as a mishearing of "Don't lay that all on me", which is a likely construction. (=Don't blame me for everything.)
     

    Paulfromitaly

    MODerator
    Italian
    It is still very likely something misheard- the most common phrase can be found here without the "out".
    G**gle finds 5 hits for "Don't lay that out on me" (one of them is this thread) and over 8,000 for "Don't lay that on me"!
    I'm not arguing that the most common expression doesn't include "out".
    I'm just saying that "Don’t lay that out on me" is what he says, whether that be common or not :)
    What is the source of the script?

    I can imagine "Don't lay that out on me" as a mishearing of "Don't lay that all on me", which is a likely construction. (=Don't blame me for everything.)
    Maybe :)
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I see that the script you link to is a transcript.
    Terror on the Docks transcript by Sarah Spearey.
    I believe that means that the script was written by someone who was listening to the dialogue rather than being a copy of the original film script. Thus it is susceptible to errors in hearing.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    It's also true (I am reliably informed by two minutes' googling:rolleyes:) that the transcriber is a BrE-speaker; she may not have been familiar with this idiom, which I think is primarily AmE.

    EDIT: I've just listened to the video on a certain website. What I hear is "Don't lay that on me":).
     
    Last edited:

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    I'm not arguing that the most common expression doesn't include "out".
    I'm just saying that "Don’t lay that out on me" is what he says, whether that be common or not :)

    Maybe :)

    Dunno why you're arguing about it, we're all agreed we're not familiar with what you heard, but we'd still hazard the same meaning!
     
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