layered

plexi

New Member
French
hi I wanna say : "des images superposées traversent son esprit"
my attempt : "layered pictures pops in to her head"

Can you confirm or declare null ?
 
  • Broff

    Senior Member
    French
    It depends what you are trying to describe. If the images are one in front of the other I would say: juxtaposed images pop into her head
     

    Teafrog

    Senior Member
    UK English (& rusty French…)
    hi also to you, you wanna say superposer? 'ave you checked 'ere first? 'cos "mettre en couches" and "superposer" are a bit different, like, and "traverser" and "to pop" don't mean the same fing either, like. see also 'ere. i declare null
     

    Broff

    Senior Member
    French
    hi also to you, you wanna say superposer? 'ave you checked 'ere first? 'cos "mettre en couches" and "superposer" are a bit different, like, and "traverser" and "to pop" don't mean the same fing either, like. see also 'ere. i declare null
    I always thought that "to pop into one's mind" and 'traverser l'esprit' were equivalent. :confused:
     

    USMeg

    Senior Member
    English/USA
    Traverser l'esprit sounds more like the English "cross one's mind" as opposed to "pop into." There's more of an element of being surprised by the thought when it "pops" in, and more of a contemplative, or maybe fleeting (it's there and gone), with "crossing." I love "jumbled images flash through."
     

    Teafrog

    Senior Member
    UK English (& rusty French…)
    Imo, there is a difference (in English, at least), and I see a similar difference, albeit slight, in French as well.

    I was talking to a colleague about the panned installation of the machinery, when it crossed my mind we could adopt a different method of assembly: the idea came as a tangent from the current discussion; it wandered (gingerly) in.

    I was walking down the road when a different method of assembly popped into my mind, which would resolve a problem with the installation of the machinery: the idea came out of the blue, whilst doing something unrelated to the current activity; it came as a (swift) surprise.
     

    Moon Palace

    Senior Member
    French
    Hello Teafrog :) I agree with you and I believe in French too there is this tiny difference, but I would have linked it to the speed induced by the verbs, 'venir' being slower than 'traverser' which is sudden and so produces surprise.
     

    Cath.S.

    Senior Member
    français de France
    Hello Teafrog :) I agree with you and I believe in French too there is this tiny difference, but I would have linked it to the speed induced by the verbs, 'venir' being slower than 'traverser' which is sudden and so produces surprise.
    Tu as peut-être raison, d'ailleurs je me propose de chronométrer mes pensées à l'avenir afin de savoir quel verbe employer. ;)
    Sérieusement, si je dois trouver une nuance (en extrayant les idées au forceps, je l'avoue...) entre les deux, il me semble qu'une idée qui nous traverse l'esprit n'y demeure pas, alors qu'une pensée qui nous vient peut s'attarder, quoiqu'elle ne le fasse pas systématiquement, et c'est souvent regrettable d'ailleurs.
     

    Moon Palace

    Senior Member
    French
    Tu as peut-être raison, d'ailleurs je me propose de chronométrer mes pensées à l'avenir afin de savoir quel verbe employer. ;)
    Sérieusement, si je dois trouver une nuance (en extrayant les idées au forceps, je l'avoue...) entre les deux, il me semble qu'une idée qui nous traverse l'esprit n'y demeure pas, alors qu'une pensée qui nous vient peut s'attarder, quoiqu'elle ne le fasse pas systématiquement, et c'est souvent regrettable d'ailleurs.
    J'avais dit que la différence était ténue..:rolleyes:
    Il me semble que traverser est un acte plus 'éclair' en effet que 'venir', qui demande une impulsion (je suis d'accord sur les forceps!! :D), et c'est peut-être là aussi la différence que fait Teafrog: 'venir' pourrait être l'expression d'un lien avec l'activité en cours.
    Alors que si l'idée nous 'traverse', elle ne reste peut-être pas, mais elle semble plus autonome en tout cas, plus surprenante.
    Si ça c'est pas du 'hair-splitting' pour rester polie... :eek::D

    Question: ce qui est regrettable, c'est qu'elle ne s'attarde pas ou qu'elle ne le fasse pas systématiquement? Les idées qui nous traversent ne sont pas non plus toutes bonnes. Heureusement qu'elles ne font donc que passer. :p
     

    Teafrog

    Senior Member
    UK English (& rusty French…)
    :D
    … d'ailleurs je me propose de chronométrer mes pensées à l'avenir afin de savoir quel verbe employer…
    :D
    Une autre pensée (à chronométrer) m’a sauté à l’esprit = another thought (to be timed) popped into… / leaped into my… / jumped to mind

    Repêché du SNRTL: P. anal. Sauter à l'esprit, à l'oreille. Cela reste subtil et ne saute pas à l'esprit (Gide, Journal, 1931, p. 1092). [Ces objets sonores] vous sautaient à l'oreille sans idée préconçue (Schaeffer, Rech. mus. concr., 1952, p. 42).

    To pop into mind = sauter à l'esprit (un peu plus vivace et éclair, et qui de plus qui ne demande pas de forceps ;) )
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top