lazier=more lazy?

fikolek

Member
Polish
The dictionaries I use do not say that more lazy, most lazy are allowed. However, I found these examples on the BBC website:

...it made me more creative (if anything it made me more lazy).

It's going to make people even more lazy...

People are starting to get lazier and figuring out ways to be more lazy.

Does it mean both forms (lazier and more lazy) are possible?
 
  • panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    If you look at previous threads about how to form comparative and superlative forms, you will see that two-syllable adjectives may take -er and -est, or more <adjective> and most <adjective>.
     

    Kevinbailey

    New Member
    American
    There is a slight difference between "lazier" and "more lazy", the former representing a strict comparison ("lazier than somebody/someone..."), the second expressing an escalation in the degree of laziness felt (compared with the same laziness felt before). It is that "escalation" which is easier to represent with the "more".
    Example:1.My brother is lazier than my cousin Jack.
    2. I feel more lazy than yesterday. or My son is a lot more lazy than he's a teenager.
     

    Kevinbailey

    New Member
    American
    I came across that article a few days ago when I was teaching online regarding comparative adjectives. I just can't find it now. Lol. But come to think of it, the explanation is pretty straight forward and acceptable. It's the same thing with angrier and more angry.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    No difference at all for me either - at least in the sentences given by the OP.


    It made me more upset; in fact, it made me
    more angry. (parallelism)

    It's going to make people even more angry/angrier.

    She is more angry/angrier than me about all this.

    People are starting to get angrier.
    (Here, where there is a gradual increase of anger, I would definitely prefer "People are starting to get more (and more) angry".
     

    User With No Name

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    I agree that "lazier" and "more lazy" are interchangeable.

    If you look at previous threads about how to form comparative and superlative forms, you will see that two-syllable adjectives may take -er and -est, or more <adjective> and most <adjective>.
    I don't know about this. I can think of several two-syllable adjectives that don't (for me) allow the -er and -est forms. Just off the top of my head: tired, boring, nervous, spiteful....

    Seems to me that every "rule" I've seen about this has a lot of exceptions.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top