Le tout (philosophie)

alex k

Member
French - France
Bonjour,

" le chemin qui mène à l'essence du tout " , " se fondre avec le tout "

Dans un contexte philosophique, j'aimerais traduire la notion de " tout ", considéré comme " l'ensemble de tout ce qui est " avec cette nuance que ce " tout "est indissociable.

J'hésite entre : the whole ( thing ) / the main thing / all . Pourriez vous m'aider?
 
  • Canard

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    I must admit I've never heard "allness."

    the path which leads to the meaning of it all, everything, existence, life
    to become one with everything, the whole, the world, the universe
     
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    alex k

    Member
    French - France
    The problem is that I prefer to use the same word in all expressions that are recurrent in my text :
    "the path that leads to the meaning of ..."
    "make one with..."
    "start from nothing to understand..."
    "we are part of..."
    Which would you choose between " it all" and " the whole" or can they both work in these places ?
     

    unigirl

    Senior Member
    English - New Zealand
    Hi alex k

    What type of philosophy are you studying? I'm assuming you're looking at metaphysics, but it could be another branch.
    If you tell me who the philosopher is that you're reading, or the specific area you are looking at, I should be able to help you. I study philosophy as well, so I should (fingers crossed) be able to tell you how that particular person or idea is usually translated in english.
     
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    alex k

    Member
    French - France
    I am reading someone who probably takes inspiration from Marcus Aureles, Epictetus, probably Plato, Stoics and Krishnamurti. Thank you for offering your help.
     

    Cathou

    Member
    Francophone, Canada
    Hmmm.... being more of an existentialist, I might have said consciousness (or if we were getting good and German, dasein), but I do not think that would fit with the philosophers you are reading.
     

    istanza

    Senior Member
    Français - Québec
    The problem is that I prefer to use the same word in all expressions that are recurrent in my text :
    "the path that leads to the meaning of ..."
    "make one with..."
    "start from nothing to understand..."
    "we are part of..."
    Which would you choose between " it all" and " the whole" or can they both work in these places ?

    Between "it all" and "the whole" I would go for "the whole".
     

    unigirl

    Senior Member
    English - New Zealand
    Sorry for the late reply

    I think I would use "the whole" - it seems to fit best.

    You might want to have a look at Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy - http://plato.stanford.edu/ It is a free trusted academic site maintained by Stanford, so much so that you can cite their articles just as you cite journal articles - I do it for every essay I write. If Stanford says it, it will be right.

    I had a brief look, and think that "the whole" fits with those philosophers, however you might want to check it out yourself, I could have missed something.

    Hope that helps
     

    alex k

    Member
    French - France
    I have read http://plato.stanford.edu and I still do not know which word to use. I read about mereology and the definitions of " wholes" and "parts". If someone writes about " the whole " in a story to be read by uninitiated people, do you think he will be understood? Normally " whole" would fit but does a more all-purpose word exists?
     

    unigirl

    Senior Member
    English - New Zealand
    I think "the whole" works. I'm having a lot of trouble trying to think of any other word that fits, so I'd go with "the whole"
     
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