...lead her father, Matsuno Rokuro Zaemon Nyudo, to attain Buddhahood.

Karen123456

Senior Member
Malaysia English
These passages of the Lotus Sutra express that the Lotus Sutra is the true teaching that had the power to lead her father, Matsuno Rokuro Zaemon Nyudo, to attain Buddhahood.

The above is from a Buddhist magazine.

Is 'to attain' correct? Thanks.
 
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Why are you asking, Karen - do you think it should be something else?


    (it looks OK to me:).)
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    I think that the sentence as written implies that Nyudo did, in fact, attain Buddhahood, whereas "toward attaining" would imply that he made progress toward Buddhahood but did not attain it. Others may disagree.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    I would omit the verb: "... the true teaching that had the power to lead her father, Matsuno Rokuro Zaemon Nyudo, to attain Buddhahood."
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I think that the sentence as written implies that Nyudo did, in fact, attain Buddhahood, whereas "toward attaining" would imply that he made progress toward Buddhahood but did not attain it. Others may disagree.
    It says the book had the power to do that, not that it actually did it.
    "These passages of the Lotus Sutra express that the Lotus Sutra is the true teaching that had the power to lead her father, Matsuno Rokuro Zaemon Nyudo, to attain Buddhahood." would mean that he did attain Buddhahood.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I would omit the verb: "... the true teaching that had the power to lead her father, Matsuno Rokuro Zaemon Nyudo, to attain Buddhahood."
    I would say that you can lead someone to Buddhism, but not to Buddhahood. You can lead a horse to water, but you can't make it drink.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Hmmm... I don't know about these things but "It was the marriage to the millionaire Sir Myridon that lead led her to happiness.": to lead someone to a state seems OK.
     
    Last edited:

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Our dictionary here , as well as Cambridge, affirms my impression that the simple past of lead is "led."

    No? (That affects the reading of the OP's sentence.)
     
    Last edited:

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    You're right, I must remember that lead rhymes with read but lead rhymes with read. :thumbsup: I have corrected it.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Hmmm... I don't know about these things but "It was the marriage to the millionaire Sir Myridon that lead led her to happiness.": to lead someone to a state seems OK.
    You can lead someone to a place where they can be happy, but that won't make them ecstatically happy. I think you can lead someone to (join a) religion, but that doesn't cause them to become the Pope (to switch religions).
     
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