Learn more vs Find out more

Marco PCA

Senior Member
Spanish - Mexico
Hi there,

I'm wondering if "to learn more" has the same meaning as "to find out more".

For example, I would like to [learn more | find out more] about the roles that your company have.

The idea is to have more information or details about the positions available in that company.

Thank you,
Marco
 
  • boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    In your example I see no practical difference between the two phrases - learn and find out. The message is basically the same.

    (and then the message is marred :) by the second part of the sentence, which sounds ungrammatical and generally wrong)
     

    Marco PCA

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Mexico
    In your example I see no practical difference between the two phrases - learn and find out. The message is basically the same.

    (and then the message is marred :) by the second part of the sentence, which sounds ungrammatical and generally wrong)

    Hi boozer,

    Thanks for your reply.

    What part of the sentence do you refer to when you say it sounds wrong? "about the roles that your company have"?

    Thank you
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    ...the roles that your company have... :confused:

    First, the grammar mistake - the company has

    Then, I am not even sure I would use the verb 'have'. You play a role or play a part. But even that gives us a sentence taken out of context that may, within context, mean something or mean nothing. Role in what?

    Which leads me to the next objection. Why does the company have many roles in your sentence? It is customary to focus on one only.

    I would like to find out more about your company's role/the role your company plays.

    Perhaps you should provide more context and start a new thread, though. We are not really supposed to proofread. :)
     

    Marco PCA

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Mexico
    I see. What happens is that someone working in the HR department of a company said they have a couple of roles (positions/vacancies).

    Thank you for your reply,
    Marco
     

    mgarizona

    Senior Member
    US - American English
    As said, no practical difference between them, but consider that "learn more about" is somewhat more formal and suggests a more needful inquiry than does "find out more about", which has more a sense of satisfying a curiosity. In most contexts it's a negligible difference but might help you decide which to use.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    US English
    In AE we never say "role" to talk about available positions in a company. We use "openings" and "positions". They could be "vacant positions" or "open positions". But they aren't "roles".

    Both "learn more" and "find out more" mean "get more information". All three of those phrases are good, in the situation you are talking about.
     

    Marco PCA

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Mexico
    In AE we never say "role" to talk about available positions in a company. We use "openings" and "positions". They could be "vacant positions" or "open positions". But they aren't "roles".

    Both "learn more" and "find out more" mean "get more information". All three of those phrases are good, in the situation you are talking about.

    Thank you for your comments. Now, I would like to know, out of curiosity if the word "role" sound ok to British English speakers because I've been using this word in New Zealand and no one told me anything before hehe.

    Thanks
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    I see. What happens is that someone working in the HR department of a company said they have a couple of roles (positions/vacancies).
    I am not aware of any variety of English in which 'role' means 'job opening', 'position of employment', etc. I probably could ask someone 'What is your role in your company?' but I would be using 'role' figuratively, in a much broader sense than, say, 'post'.
     
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