Leave him an unimpeded shot at a two-yard golf putt

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AkumaM

New Member
Estonian
Hello all!

I need to translate a text into Estonian, which I have no problem with, except for this one sentence '
He might have been asking his opponent to leave him an unimpeded shot at a two-yard golf putt.'
I do not need the translation, but an explanation. Is this an expression or is it literal? Could someone, please, explain it?

Thank you so much in advance!
~AkumaM
 
  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Hello AkumaM,

    Welcome to the forum. :)


    What is the topic? Are they talking about playing golf, or are they talking about something else and comparing it to golf? This information about the context will help us give you a good answer.

    Also, please tell us what it is that puzzles you. We would like to be sure that we are answering the right question.

    Where did you see this? We always ask you to name your source. :) (See Rule 4.)
     

    AkumaM

    New Member
    Estonian
    I apologize! It is from 'One fat Englishman' by Amis, K.

    'Out of the way, Roger, please.' Joe's tone held no menace. He might have been asking his opponent to leave him an unimpeded shot at a two-yard golf putt. 'Just move aside, will you?'

    What confuses me is what exactly is 'an unimpended shot at a two-yard golf putt'. Can it be paraphrased?
     
    Last edited:

    George French

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    This has to do with golf etiquette. You must not under any circumstance try to influence your playing partner by action or word.

    GF..

    Nothing to do with English, only good manners. One of the few games where the etiquette requires you to have a copy of the rules with you when you are playing in a competition.
     
    Last edited:

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    What confuses me is what exactly is 'an unimpended shot at a two-yard golf putt'. Can it be paraphrased?
    You do not need to know that (and if you do, the words have the literal meaning). The sentence means, "the statement was given in the manner of a statement of the obvious - a request that would automatically be complied with because of simple politeness and knowledge of the rules/conditions."
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    The sentence means, "the statement was given in the manner of a statement of the obvious - a request that would automatically be complied with because of simple politeness and knowledge of the rules/conditions."
    I don't think there is enough context to say that. What is Joe doing, and why does he want Roger to move aside? Why the comment about "menace"?
     

    Local skill

    New Member
    Arabic
    thats the whole thing:

    << Summary of deleted quotation: Joe is breaking headlamps with what looks like an iron bar. Roger is worried and tries to stop him. >>

    'Out of the way, Roger, please.' Joe's tone held no menace. He might have been asking his opponent to leave him an unimpeded shot at a two-yard golf putt. 'Just move aside, will you?'

    << Summary: Roger tries to persuade Joe to stop, but Joe says it is his car and he can do what he wants to it. Another friend comes up and tries to stop Joe, and Joe says he just wants to 'get this job done.' >>
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Hello Local skill,

    Welcome to the forum. :)

    The added sentences give some very helpful context. :thumbsup:

    Unfortunately we aren't allowed to quote more than 4 sentences. I am removing the excessive quotation and summarize the rest so people will know how to interpret the line we are discussing. :)
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    My interpretation, given this context:

    As George F says, in an actual golf game, it would be ordinary good manners to step aside. What is striking about this is that Joe is destroying his car, the sort of thing that people usually don't do unless they are angry. It isn't a game of golf. Joe is treating a strange situation as though it were ordinary. It is very odd behavior.
     
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