Leave it with/to me

volver

Senior Member
french belgium
Hello,


My colleague don't want to do his job and ask me to do what has to do in his place.

I said that I will but she should have taken care of it as it's part of her job.

Then, she changed her mind and said " leave it to me".

I don't remember if she said "leave it to me" or" leave it with me"

What would you use?

Are they both correct?

Can you please explain me why?


Thank you

VOLVER
 
  • nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    Hello,


    My colleague don't want to do his job and ask me to do what has to do in his place.

    I said that I will but she should have taken care of it as it's part of her job.

    Then, she changed her mind and said " leave it to me".

    I don't remember if she said "leave it to me" or" leave it with me"

    What would you use?

    Are they both correct?

    Can you please explain me why?


    Thank you

    VOLVER
    I would say "leave it to me", I don't know why but "leave it with me" sounds strange to me.
     

    out2lnch

    Senior Member
    English-Canada
    Generally, leave it to me means "let me handle it or take care of it". If someone says leave it with me, then normally that means that either they have something that is to be left with the person for some future action.

    Ex.

    I could leave my dog with my neighbour while I go on vacation, but I could also ask someone to leave a problem with me, and I'll think about it/try to solve it. IF something needs to get done, then 'with' doesn't make as much sense to me. Can't explain the whys of any of this, but this is how it is normally used.

    In your case then, she is saying for you to let her take care of it, so she probably said (or meant) to leave it to her.
     

    liliput

    Senior Member
    U.K. English
    In this context, I would understand "leave it to me" in the same way as out2lnch - "I'll deal with it".
    "Leave it with me" has more of a sense of "I'll deal with it when I have time" but I also have the sense that it should involve some physical object, like a report for example.
     

    El escoces

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    I agree with the other comments, although I don't feel the same need as liliput for a "physical" thing in the case of "leave it with me". "I need a few days off", I might say to the boss. "Leave it with me", he would reply (either expressly or impliedly adding, "I'll see what I can do".

    My colleague don't want to do his job and ask me to do what has to do in his place.

    I said that I will but she should have taken care of it as it's part of her job.
    There are a few errors in your original question, volver. The gender of your colleague changes from masculine to feminine, and there are a few problems with tenses.

    I suggest this is what would be correct:

    My colleague didn't want to do her job and asked me to do what had to be done in her place. I said that I would, but that she should have taken care of it herself, as it's part of her job.
     

    Yichen

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    You see, I cleaned out my locker because I didn't want to leave a mess _____ anyone else.
    A. for
    B. with
    key A.
    source: Just for Fun

    Recently, I saw a question adapted from the article.
    In that question, there are two options for / with, and the key is for.

    My puzzle is,
    Is option B (with) wrong here in this sentence?


    Many many thanks.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Hello, Yichen. I agree with the answer key that for is the most likely and meaningful preposition to use in that blank. I didn't want to leave a mess for anyone else is a shorter way to say I didn't want to leave a mess for anyone else to clean up. With doesn't make any sense in that sentence.
     
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