leaves in its wake more than its share of questions

LQZ

Senior Member
Mandarin
The finality of Mr. Davis’s sentence, and the outpouring of protest worldwide, leaves in its wake more than its share of questions — many that go beyond the facts of the case to encompass fundamental issues of capital punishment. The New York Times (subscription)

Dear all,

What does the bold part mean here? Thanks.


LQZ
 
  • Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    A wake, literally, is the trail of a boat in water. As a boat moves, it leaves a wake. (The word "wake" also has other unrelated meanings. They don't matter here.)

    Figuratively, the wake of anything is the trail it leaves behind. One could say "The king moved through the crowd, leaving a wake of open-mouthed stares."

    In this case, while the Davis case is over with Mr. Davis's death, it leaves behind many questions. They follow from it as surely as the wake of a boat follows from its passage through the water.

    "More than its share of questions" - more questions than it should leave.
     

    LQZ

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    A wake, literally, is the trail of a boat in water. As a boat moves, it leaves a wake. (The word "wake" also has other unrelated meanings. They don't matter here.)

    Figuratively, the wake of anything is the trail it leaves behind. One could say "The king moved through the crowd, leaving a wake of open-mouthed stares."

    In this case, while the Davis case is over with Mr. Davis's death, it leaves behind many questions. They follow from it as surely as the wake of a boat follows from its passage through the water.

    "More than its share of questions" - more questions than it should leave.
    Thank you, Egmont.

    Your explanation is very helpful. :)
     
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