leaving out the verb

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huynhvantinhftu

Senior Member
Vietnamese
The situation: There are two men talk together, the man A criticizes the man B for B's selfish. The A says the sentence (1) and (2)
(1) Do you think you are the only one with wife and kids? (2) Doesn't Bob also?

The meaning the A intends to say in the sentence (2) is that "Doesn't Bob also have wife and kids?"

Question 1:
I wonder What a native speaker thinks when he hears the sentence (2). Because the main verb in the sentence (1) is "think", It seems that the sentence (2) means "Doesn't Bob also think you are the only one with wife and kids?"
Question 2: If the sentence (2) works, Can the A says the sentence (3) instead of (2)?
(3) Doesn't Bob either? = Doesn't Bob have wife and kids either?


Thank you for taking the trouble to help me.
 
  • sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    "Doesn't Bob also?" appears to mean "Doesn't Bob also have a wife and kids?", but the verb "to have" doesn't appear in sentence (1), so sentence (2) doesn't read well to me.

    ("Doesn't Bob also think you are the only one with a wife and kids?" seems impossible to me: Why would Bob think that, and anyway, doesn't Bob know about 'your' wife and kids?)
     
    Last edited:

    huynhvantinhftu

    Senior Member
    Vietnamese
    "Doesn't Bob also?" means "Doesn't Bob also have a wife and kids?", but the verb "to have" doesn't appear in sentence (1), so sentence (2) doesn't read well to me.
    (1.1) Do you think you are the only one having wife and kids? (2) Doesn't Bob also?
    (1.2) Do you think you are the only one that has wife and kids? (2) Doesn't Bob also?

    Are the (1.1) and (1.2) clearer?
    Btw, can I say the sentence (3) in #1?
     

    huynhvantinhftu

    Senior Member
    Vietnamese
    1.1 is ungrammatical, because of "having".
    1.2 is OK if you insert "a" before "wife". The reply is not bad, but I would prefer "Doesn't Bob too?"
    It means that I should use "to have" instead of "having".

    (1.3) Do you think you are the only one to have a wife and kids? (3) Doesn't Bob either?
    Can you confirm me if the (3) is grammatically corect?
     

    huynhvantinhftu

    Senior Member
    Vietnamese
    1.3 is correct. (3) is not: "Doesn't Bob neither too?":tick:
    :)
    sound shift, Just one more relevant question before the new year's eve.
    I am confused that "either/neither" is used in negative sentences. For example, I can say: "John doesn't have a house. John doesn't have a wife and kids either."
    So why we can't use "neither" in the sentence (3)? Is it because the (3) is a rhetorical question?
     
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