'led a ship' vs 'ship captain'

Heliss

Member
Bulgarian and English
Is this sentence correct:


This important position cannot be executed by a person who has never led a ship.


or it is better:


This important position cannot be executed by a person who has never been a ship captain.
 
  • Smarsh336

    Member
    British English
    It would probably work better to use "to captain" as a verb, so...

    This important position cannot be executed by a person who has never captained a ship.
     

    Arrius

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    The second is more common though it should read: a ship's captain, and the first also sounds a little odd, and would be better expressed by who has never been in command of a vessel.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I'm quite happy with either Smarsh's suggestion - who has never captained a ship, or Arrius's - who has never been in command of a vessel.

    I wouldn't say who has never led a ship, because that might be ambiguous. I remember when I was a child at school hearing a talk by a Chief Petty Officer on a warship, which ended 'In short, if I have a message for you today, it's this: if you can lead a ship in PT, you can lead a ship anywhere'.

    This led us to coin a new verb, to leadership, which we used rather a lot.
     
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