leisure time

mimi2

Senior Member
vietnam vietnamese
The antonym of "leisure time" is "busy time" or "working time".
I choose "working time" but I am not sure. Thanks.
 
  • mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    Is it wrong with "working time"?
    Why do you like changing into "working hours"?
    And is "busy time" not the antonym of " leisure time"?
    Thanks.
     

    pamproductions

    Banned
    England/English
    yYou could also say that HIS JOB LEFT HIM LITTLE TIME FOR LEISURE.

    Moderator note: Do not post messages in ALL CAPITAL LETTERS

    Please note also: Members must do their best to write using standard language forms.
     

    Aud Duck

    Senior Member
    English--United States
    mimi2 said:
    Is it wrong with "working time"?
    Why do you like changing into "working hours"?
    And is "busy time" not the antonym of " leisure time"?
    Thanks.
    "Working time" is something I have never heard, though people would understand what you meant.

    "Working hours" is a bit ambiguous, since that could also be taken to mean "office hours" (i.e. 8-5, Monday through Friday). It would be clear if you used it in the right context, though.

    "Busy time" is not an antonym of leisure time. It strikes me as the sort of thing you might put on a preschool lesson plan.

    And, here is the grammar that I would use in asking your question:
    mimi2 said:
    What is wrong with "working time"?
    Why do you prefer "working hours"?
    And is "busy time" not the antonym of " leisure time"?
    Thanks.
    I don't mean to be critical or anything. It's just that it helps me a great deal when people correct my Spanish, so I thought I'd do the same for English.
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    The best I can think of is:

    "non-leisure time".

    It's not an elegant solution, but it is used, and it is clear.

    For instance: Right now my wife has so many responsiblities to take care of during her non-leisure time that she has no time to relax when she is finally free of work.

    The problem is that "leisure time" means time to relax, have fun, be free, etc. But there are many things that prevent us from having leisure time, and work is often only a small part of it. What about young mothers with several small children, for instance?
     

    petereid

    Senior Member
    english
    The antonym of "leisure time" is "busy time" or "working time".
    ***
    "working time" or "work time" ar both broad enough to include domestic and professional work
    Do not use "busy time", you may be busy watching friends play tennis.
    "working hours" Most people would understand as being at your place of work.
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    panjandrum said:
    There doesn't of course have to be a precise antonym for leisure time. The closest, in form, would be work time (as pete suggested).
    The problem is that by "leisure time" I mean what I do when I am free to do exactly as I please. "Work time" doesn't mean the opposite to me. There are many "obligations" I have that are not directly related either to work or "domestic duties".
     

    nycphotography

    Senior Member
    American English
    We don't necessarily have a noun form, but you can easily say:

    ... the rest of the time he's busy.

    Busy does not necessarily mean at a job, and covers the exact antonym of leisure. Unless he is busy recreating. ;-)
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Results 1 - 10 of about 866,000 for "non-leisure time".

    There are probably a lot of duplications, but even so it is common.

    Gaer
     
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