lent or loaned

blueberrymuffin

Senior Member
English - U.S.
Hi!
I have heard people use loaned as the past tense of to lend.

Kathy loaned me that movie last week.
Is it correct in an informal, colloquial setting? Is it correct grammatically speaking?

Thanks
 
  • blueberrymuffin

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Oh good. Thanks. But, does "loaned" sound a little too colloquial or can it be used in a formal setting?

    Thanks again!
     

    river

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    The past tense of "lend" is "lent," and the past tense of "loan" is "loaned." The verb loan is standard only when money is the subject of the transaction.
     

    CAMullen

    Senior Member
    US, English
    I've read that although the rule isn't often observed anymore, "loan" is a noun and "lend" is the verb. So it is becoming acceptable, but is still just a wee bit colloquial.
     

    Jumble

    Member
    USA
    Hi!​
    bartleby.com says...

    a gread deal about loan and lent, but WR Rule #16 does not permit copying or large quantities of text from other sources.
    Panjandrum
    (Moderator)


     

    cirrus

    Senior Member
    UK English
    A loan for me would be something for which money is expected back. If someone lends you a thing, all they expect is that they get the thing back. You might lend your neighbour tools when they are doing DIY. A bank might give you a loan for a new car: they will expect both regular repayments and will charge interest. All you expect from your neighbour is smiles or an invite for a drink or a meal.
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    According to Fowler's New Modern English Usage, we all used loan as a verb until the last century.
    Over the past 100 years or so, it has gradually faded out in BE, but has survived in AE.
    I can't find any support for the suggestion that loan (verb) is limited to money.
     

    nmuscatine

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    As for the suggestion that loan as a verb is limited to money, I would dispute it. For example, the library loans us books. Museums loan their collections to other museums or galleries. In either case, we would say that the items are "on loan."
     

    river

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    A few more opinions:

    As for loan, the Wall Street Journal stylebook advises: “Avoid as a verb. Use lend, lent.”

    The New York Times Manual of Style and Usage - loan: do not use 'loan' as a verb. Use 'lend' and, in the past tense, lent rather than loaned.

    Most writers seem to prefer 'lend', although some accpet 'loan' in financial contexts.If your ear is not offended by "Loan me your pen" or by "Friends, Romans, countrymen, loan me your ears," the authorities are right so far as you are concerned. The rest of us will continue to prefer 'lend' though we recognize that 'loan' has a basis in both history and usage. The Careful Writer, Theodore Bernstein
     

    wordsmith467

    New Member
    English
    Lent is not a past tense of lend, as in, "I will lend you a hand."

    Loaned is the proper usage in all past tense verbage.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Lent is not a past tense of lend, as in, "I will lend you a hand."

    Loaned is the proper usage in all past tense verbage.
    The Oxford English Dictionary, (and using the search box at the top of the page you will find that also) Merriam-Webster, Random House and American Heritage Dictionaries all provide lent as the past participle of lend.
     

    wordsmith467

    New Member
    English
    I stand corrected. I learned in college, in Tokyo, (maybe that explains it), that lent is not the proper usage, but loaned is, instead. It's always perturbed me, but thanks for that. I'll continue to use loaned, though; personal choice.
     

    wordsmith467

    New Member
    English
    OK. This is something that has always bugged me. Lent just sounds wrong, sorry. I'm sticking with loaned. Am I still in the club?
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Although this is an old thread, as long as it has been resurrected we might as well deal with it.

    Loaned is not a past tense of lend, and it is absurd to suggest that it is. The past tense of lend is lent.

    On the other hand, loaned is the past tense of loan, regardless of whether or not one accepts "to loan" as a legitimate verb.
     

    jeleny

    New Member
    hindi
    The past tense of "lend" is "lent," and the past tense of "loan" is "loaned." The verb loan is standard only when money is the subject of the transaction.
    This was a greatly helpful definition. I applaud you for your intelligence my dear chum (amigo).

    << --- >>


    Yours most sincerely with my dearest wishes for a satisfactory life

    jeleny

    Professor of English
    Oxbridge University
     
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    englishjasmin

    Senior Member
    Slavic
    I did some online research and it says that in British English "loan" is a noun and "lend" is a verb. In American English both can be used as a verb, but several American style-books prefer the British rule. The verb "loan" would usually relate to money, art-work, or other physical objects (e.g. loan a book, money, or artwork). However, you can not use a loan as a verb if no physical object or money are involved (e.g. lend me a few minutes of your time).
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I did some online research and it says that in British English "loan" is a noun and "lend" is a verb. In American English both can be used as a verb, but several American style-books prefer the British rule. The verb "loan" would usually relate to money, art-work, or other physical objects (e.g. loan a book, money, or artwork). However, you can not use a loan as a verb if no physical object or money are involved (e.g. lend me a few minutes of your time).
    That's strange - to my mind, "loan" can certainly still be used as a verb in BrE. The more usual verb in BrE is, however, "lend". Libraries "lend" books"; but they could also "loan" books.

    I suppose that "loan" does imply something physical. Friends, Romans, countrymen - loan me your ears???
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    That's strange - to my mind, "loan" can certainly still be used as a verb in BrE. The more usual verb in BrE is, however, "lend". Libraries "lend" books"; but they could also "loan" books.

    I suppose that "loan" does imply something physical. Friends, Romans, countrymen - loan me your ears???
    Indeed! I used to depend on the "Inter-library loans" system for obscure books when I was doing my graduate work in the UK!
     
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