les rayons du soleil

  • Prince Herman

    Senior Member
    English- US
    “The rays of the sun glisten on my skin” or “The sunbeams glisten on my skin”.
    Where the English verb "to glisten" means to shine brightly or reflect light as from a wet surface.
     

    jierbe31

    Senior Member
    French from France
    “The rays of the sun glisten on my skin” or “The sunbeams glisten on my skin”.
    Where the English verb "to glisten" means to shine brightly or reflect light as from a wet surface.
    Although I like your translation, may I just point out that the English "glisten" (= miroiter/scintiller) doesn't translate the French "glisser" (= glide)?
     

    Prince Herman

    Senior Member
    English- US
    Quite fair enough. I do not pretend to know the nuance of the French language, for that is where true mastery of a language resides. But I don't think that in this situation a literal translation conveys the intended idea. I think the poetic image is better conveyed to the English reader with the verb "glisten." I cannot think of a usage for the verb "to glide" in English that would encompass the image of the original sentence which might have read: Les rayons du soleil glissent sur ma peau, que tu aimais tant caresser. Le ciel est si beau, presque aussi beau que toi. Or perhaps, Les rayons du soleil glissent sur ma peau, m’apportant les promesses de l’amour, comme les vagues dans l’eau, reviennent continuellement et toujours. The "waves in the water" is a more apt image for glisten, for example as in customary usage, the sun glistens on the water. I hope this helps.

    P.S. On second thought, if the concept is truly "to glide" then the English verb that would be both appropriate and in common usage for the image sought to be conveyed, could be "to caress" (to touch or stroke in an affectionate manner) rendering: "The rays of the sun [or sunbeams] caress my skin." I think I would go with that translation.
     
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    Julie Bessa

    New Member
    French
    ok, thanks to help me . It's sometimes the litteral translation doesn't mean e real expression. Maybe it's better for me to choose "glitten" , I don't know !
     

    jierbe31

    Senior Member
    French from France
    Thank you for the language lesson, Prince Herman.:)
    I completely share your view, all the more so since your proposition is far more poetic than the original one.;)
    Have a very nice and happy New Year!
     
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