lest / for fear / so that not

Julianus

Senior Member
Korean
Hellow~.

I have also learned that "lest / for fear / so that no" are the same meaning.

and then,


1. I made haste lest I should be late for school.

2. I made haste for fear that I should be late for school.

3. I made haste so that I would not be late for school.


are these three sentences the same meaning?

if so, 3. (a) I made haste so that I would not be late for school. ---->(b) I made haste so that I should not be late for school.

are both (a) and (b) the same meaning?


thank you for answering my question in advance.
 
  • lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    In America, we use "lest" with the subjunctive ("... lest I be late for school") - if we use it at all.

    "Lest" is highly archaic.

    "For fear that" is also pretty unusual.

    "So that" is the only one of the options that you would actually hear a contemporary speaker say in an everyday environment.

    Of course, "to make haste" is a verb that we don't use any more, either, so maybe you want to match it with one of the archaic conjunctions! My question is, who is your English teacher? Some illustrious 18th-century gentleman?
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    Q(1): Do these three sentences have the same meaning? (= 'are these three sentences the same meaning?')
    A: Yes. The three sentences have the same meaning - in my view.

    I agree with lucas that the feel of these sentences is a little dusty. It's hard to imagine any schoolchild of today ever naturally saying/writing any of the above.
    However, the expressions 'make haste', 'lest', 'for fear that' and (less significantly) 'so that' are all far from archaic in BrE.

    ~~~~~~~

    Q(2): If so,..., do both (a) and (b) have the same meaning? ('if so, ... , are both (a) and (b) the same meaning?')
    Response: This is quite a big question that you should probably pose in another thread, and then only if you feel that the many previous threads on 'would/should' don't answer your question fully. :)
     

    Julianus

    Senior Member
    Korean
    My english teacher is my grammar book.

    This book is well known to our country.

    The reason why this book seems achaic is maybe because it has translated into our laungage not from English laungage but from German or Japan laungage.

    But I can't not help studying this book because this book use our laungage.

    A few weeks later, I finally is going to finish this book. after then, I will try to study English grammar book used in English laungage.

    Could you give me some information about professional and detailed grammar book ?
     
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