'let' at the start of the sentence

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Oldbie

Member
Chinese - china
I have checked out the dictionary that said 'let' is a verb, so I wonder why are we using this word at the first of the sentence but not the word 'Letting'?

For example

Let it go.

I can't find any of subject in the above sentence.
 
  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "Letting it go" would be a noun phrase, not a whole sentence. You would have to use that as part of a sentence. For example:

    Nobody likes letting it go.
     

    Un Corbeau

    Member
    American English/French
    The subject is understood to be "you." A plural example of this usage- which you'll hear a lot- is "let's go !"
     
    I have checked out the dictionary that said 'let' is a verb, so I wonder why are we using this word at the first of the sentence but not the word 'Letting'?
    I don't understand your question.

    "Let" here is an imperative. It is entirely normal, natural, common, everyday English to have an imperative verb as the first word of a sentence:
    Let the dog out.
    Come here.
    Sit down.
    Be quiet.
    Give grandmother a kiss.

    "Letting" is a present participle. You can use a present participle as the first word of a sentence (and I don't know why you think you cannot), but it has nothing to do with the imperative.
     
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