let him not

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caireo

Senior Member
Tibetan
Hello,

I need to describe such a thing: If a boy wants to study, let him study as he wants; if he doesn't want to study, let it be. It's all up to himself." so I work out a sentence as follows:

"If he wants to study, let him; if he doesn't, let him too."

Does the sentence make sense to you? Especially the last part in the sentence, I'm not sure I should use "let him too", or "let him not".

Thank you very much.
 
  • cropje_jnr

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    To make it slightly more idiomatic, I suggest something like: If he wants to study, let him; if he doesn't, then don't make him / then that's OK as well.

    I can't think of a neat way to repeat "let" in the second part.
     

    kripan

    Member
    English
    Hello,

    I need to describe such a thing: If a boy wants to study, let him study as he wants; if he doesn't want to study, let it be. It's all up to himself." so I work out a sentence as follows:

    "If he wants to study, let him; if he doesn't, let him too."

    Does the sentence make sense to you? Especially the last part in the sentence, I'm not sure I should use "let him too", or "let him not".

    Thank you very much.
    "....if he does not then let him not" sounds much better to my ears.
    "let him too" sounds odd to me.
     
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