Let off (archery)

hectacon

Senior Member
Hindi
In Archery what does " let off' means or did I hear it wrongly? Was the commentator saying let go off.

Does it mean to draw the bow, pull the string back and release the arrow?

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  • hectacon

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    There is no way to tell what the commentator said, or whether you heard him or her wrongly.

    But I would guess it means 'released the arrow'.
    I heard either of let off or let go off. But the accent was very strong. I couldn't understand it clearly.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I suggest it was 'let go of'. 'Let go off' doesn't exist. If it was 'let go +noun' it would be substandard English.
    To 'let off' does exist, with several meanings, but how it would be used in archery I can't say.

    'Let the (something) go' is possible.
    We can only speculate with no source, no sentence even, only context.
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    Sparky Malarky

    Moderator
    English - US
    The usual archery term for letting the arrow fly is "release." A more archaic term is "loose." Nock, draw, and release, or nock, draw, and loose.

    Can you give us the whole sentence you heard?
     

    hectacon

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    The usual archery term for letting the arrow fly is "release." A more archaic term is "loose." Nock, draw, and release, or nock, draw, and loose.

    Can you give us the whole sentence you heard?
    No, I can't. <-----Off-topic comments removed by moderator (Florentia52)----->But I will give you some links.
    Choosing a Compound Bow Let-Off - Hunter's Friend Archery

    This is one more sentence.

    For example, a 60-pound bow with 80% let-off only requires 12 pounds of force to hold at full draw.

    What does it mean?
     
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    hectacon

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    There's a definition in your link.
    That means the trigger movement. Right? The motion which propels the arrow. What is the need of using technical term. Just use " bend" or " release"

    I suggest it was 'let go of'. 'Let go off' doesn't exist. If it was 'let go +noun' it would be substandard English.
    To 'let off' does exist, with several meanings, but how it would be used in archery I can't say.

    'Let the (something) go' is possible.
    We can only speculate with no source, no sentence even, only context.
    By the way, what exactly is the point of these crude and pointless images?
    Is let the arrow go, possible?
     
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    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    The bow applies force to the arrow (measured in pounds). It has to do with how much force you must apply to the bow (or the bow applies to you) for the bow to apply an amount of force to the arrow.
    It is a very technical term so it is hard not to explain it in technical terms.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    For example, a 60-pound bow with 80% let-off only requires 12 pounds of force to hold at full draw.

    What does it mean?
    For this bow, when you pull the string all the way back, it takes 12 pounds of force to hold the string in place.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    With a traditional long bow or recurve bow as you pull back on the string the resistance you feel increases steadily until you reach the full draw at which it is at its highest resistance.

    However a compound bow uses a series of cam-like pulleys that allow the resistance to fall off significantly at the full draw. The advantage of this is that it becomes easier to aim when you don't have to hold such a strong draw.

    As Myridon points out, that instead of having to hold 60 pounds of resistance per the example, you only have to hold 12 pounds, a much more manageable poundage. Not only does it make it easier to aim, it opens the sport up to people with less upper body strength.

    The amount of the resistance due to the cam action of the pulleys is called "let off".

    Here are what the three bows look like:



    According to WIKI:

    Compound bow - Wikipedia

    [...]The compound bow was first developed in 1966 by Holless Wilbur Allen in Billings, Missouri, and a US patent was granted in 1969. The compound bow has become increasingly popular. In the United States, the compound is the dominant form of bow.[...]
     
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