letter

friend_one

Member
spanish
La verdad no estoy seguro si es en aleman, si no lo es , diganme que idioma es , si es aleman ayudenme a saber que dice, gracias....:) friend_one



"Priwet Luis,
Kak dela??
U menja ochen’ horosho. Pochemu?? U nas wsjo snegom zamelo, a ja
obozhaju sneg.
Chem to pohozhe na naschu sibir’.Nastroenie otlichnoe.
Ja tebe hochu nemnozhko rasskazat’ o sebe.
Kak ja uzhe goworila mne 26 let. Zhiwu w germanii uzhe 11 let, ochen’
silno skuchaju po Rossii. Ja zamuzhem, i u nas dwa welikolepnyh syna.
Ty nawernoe sejchas dumaesh „ chjo ona mne pishit“. Ja ljublju
znakomitsja s nowymi ljudmi, i ja dumaju chto zamuzhestwo ne mishaet
imet’ pismennyh druzej ( izweni ja neznaju kak eto po russki
nazywaetsja). I ja nadejus chto ty takogo zhe mnenija, no esli net,
skazhi mne ob etom pozhalujsto. Wysylaju tebe foto iz nashej mestnosti.
Konechno u nas net takih neboskrjobow, no ja wsjo rawno ljublju nashu
derewnju, hot’ i zhiwu sdes’ wsego 5 mesjacew.
Esli u tebja est’ zhilanie so mnoj perepisywat’sja, to obeshaju w
sledujushij raz napisat’ pobolshe.
Ogromnyj priwet iz germanii
Katerina"
 
  • Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    It is a Russian text transcribed in the Latin alphabet. I can provide you with an approximate translation. A caveat: my Russian is not what it could be. I suggest that you post it in the Other Languages Forum. Hopefully you will find some natives there.

    Jana

    Hi Luis,

    How are you?
    I am fine. Why? Here everything is covered in snow, and I adore snow.
    It resembles our Siberia. I am in a cheerful mood.
    I want to tell you much about me.
    As I told you, I am 26 years old. I have lived in Germany for 11 years but miss Russia terribly. I am married and have two wonderful sons.
    I guess you have no idea why I am writing you. I love meeting new people and… (this part is incomprehensible to me, she writes „excuse me, I cannot recall the Russian expression“ but it does not resemble to anything I know…).
    I hope that you are like-minded. If not, tell me please.
    A photo of our room is enclosed. It is nothing pretentious (my guess…) but I love our village, although this has been only my fifth month here.
    If you want to be my pen-friend, I promise to tell you more next time.
    A huge greeting from Germany,

    Katarina
     

    Ralf

    Senior Member
    German
    The text you've posted is defenitely Russian, transliterated from Cyrillc to the Latin alphabet. Since there are at least two native Russian speakers on these forums it would be the best to go over to the 'Other-Languages-Forum' to ensure a most perfect translation.

    Because of the transliteration it is (at least for me) not that easy to understand. Besides I couldn't find my old Russian dictionary (I must have burried it somewhere). So I'm not sure if I understood some passages of the second part properly. My last Russian lesson dates back more than 20 years. Unfortunately I forgot most of it. What I understand without dictionary goes something like this (I added alternatives or comments in brackets):

    Hi, Luis.
    How are you (or: how's life)? (As for me) I'm very well. (If you ask me) why - it is because of all the snow around here. I really like snow. It reminds me to our Siberia. It is really great.

    I'd like to tell you a little bit more (or literally: tell you something) about myself. Like I already told you I am 26 years old. I've been living in Germany for eleven years, but (sometimes) I'm missing Russia so bad. I am married, and we have two wonderful (great) suns.

    Probably you're now wondering "why (or: what for) is she writing (about) this?" (literal translation). Well, I really like to get to know (or: get into contact with) some new people, and I think having pen-friends won't affect one's marriage - please don't blame me, but I don't know how to put it in Russian (honestly, this really doesn't make sense to me - but I'm pretty sure that is exactly what she said - perhaps it is an error). I hope you agree with me, if not, please let me know.

    I've added (no literal transaltion!) a photograph of our current home (place we're staying). Of course (literal translation), we don't have these tall buildings (literally: sky scrapers), but even therefore I love our village (literal translation, but it could also be 'the small town') I've been living in for five months.

    If you wish me to write again, I promise to tell you more next time.

    Many regards from Germany.

    Katerina
    ______________________________________________________________

    P.S.: I've just noticed Jana had already posted her version. I'm not surprised about the major differences in the second part. Nevertheless, I think my translation of the last two paragraphs is a bit closer to the original. But as suggested above, ask for help in the "Other-Languages-Forum".

    Cheers.
     

    Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    Yes, Ralf is substantially closer than me.
    Now I see some blatant mistakes in my understanding of the text:-(((
    Shame on me!

    Jana
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Hey Jana, I think you would have an advantage because you're a native Czech speaker and Russian is very close to Czech.

    E.g.:
    pod (Czech) = pod (Russian) --> I know from Pec pod Snĕžkou

    It was the same in the Czech Republic: Someone who knows Russian, does understand some Czech.
     

    Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    whodunit said:
    Hey Jana, I think you would have an advantage because you're a native Czech speaker and Russian is very close to Czech.

    Sure, I have. As you see, however, it is still not enough to beat a diligent student of the language such as Ralf :D

    Frankly, there are more disparities than similarities between Czech and Russian. Identical or similar words have frequently a secondary role in the sentence (prepositions, pronouns, ...), which makes them unsuited for conveying the meaning. I would be lost if it had not been for the brief period of compulsory Russian just before the collapse of communism. My brother, who is just two years younger, positively does not understand a single sentence.

    Jana
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    jz337 said:
    Sure, I have. As you see, however, it is still not enough to beat a diligent student of the language such as Ralf :D

    Frankly, there are more disparities than similarities between Czech and Russian. Identical or similar words have frequently a secondary role in the sentence (prepositions, pronouns, ...), which makes them unsuited for conveying the meaning. I would be lost if it had not been for the brief period of compulsory Russian just before the collapse of communism. My brother, who is just two years younger, positively does not understand a single sentence.

    Jana

    Oh, I see.

    My brother is 4 years younger than me and he also doesn't understand a single English sentence except of "What's your name?" and "How are you?", but he's studying it at school.

    I don't know Russian, but French - that's the advantage to understand a little Italian and Spanish...
     

    lonelyheartsclubband

    Member
    Russian, Hebrew: Israel
    Sí, la carta está en el ruso, pero quiero corregir su equivoca de la traducción. Sí, Ralf, tiene razón, pero hay una frase en la carta "Wysylaju tebe foto iz nashej mestnosti". La palabra "mestnost" refiere a ciudad o a pueblo. Pues, la autora de la carta quiere decir que envia la foto de su pueblo, donde vive. Por cierto, la carta está traducida muy bien.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Whodunit said:
    Oh, I see.

    I don't know Russian, but French - that's the advantage to understand a little Italian and Spanish...
    I have read somewhere (now can't remeber where but if you want to know that I may look for the source) that French had some impact on Russian too, so it could also be helpful in learning Russian. Generally French is an advantage to get many languages, especially Roman ones, it helps when you learn English too.
     

    Garou

    Member
    Neverland
    Thomas1 said:
    I have read somewhere (now can't remeber where but if you want to know that I may look for the source) that French had some impact on Russian too, so it could also be helpful in learning Russian. Generally French is an advantage to get many languages, especially Roman ones, it helps when you learn English too.

    yep, russian have 'sortir' too, just like french. But it means nothing but a closet :)
     
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