Levantine Arabic: بلاد (blaad), a plural of balad (country) used as a singular

Kenny-Alpha

Senior Member
I am very much aware that beldaan بلدان is a plural of بلد (country). However, blaad بلاد is also a plural, but it is used as a singular noun, at least in spoken Arabic (Levantine dialects).

My question is: is there a logical reason for this [using the plural as a singular]? And does this occur in other dialects as well?

It took me a while to get used to this. I was accustomed to hearing and saying baladi بلدي (my country). However, I now say blaadi بلادي for my country.
 
  • I am very much aware that beldaan بلدان is a plural of بلد (country). However, blaad بلاد is also a plural, but it is used as a singular noun, at least in spoken Arabic (Levantine dialects).

    My question is: is there a logical reason for this [using the plural as a singular]? And does this occur in other dialects as well?
    In Morocco, بلاد means "country" or "homeland" (it actually bears a lot of meanings) and it's treated as a feminine singular word to my knowledge (رجعت للبلاد for instance, "I returned to my country" or بلادي كبيرة, "my country is big") and بلدان is its plural. Broadly speaking, you will get more information here and here.
     
    In Morocco, بلاد means "country" or "homeland" (it actually bears a lot of meanings) and it's treated as a feminine singular word to my knowledge (رجعت للبلاد for instance, "I returned to my country" or بلادي كبيرة, "my country is big") and بلدان is its plural. Broadly speaking, you will get more information here and here.
    Ok thanks for your input. I guess this occurs in Morocco also. But you're saying that بلاد is a singular noun in Morocco instead of a plural. It's treated the same way also in the Levant from what I observe. However, they still used balad بلد for country also, as a singular.

    So is بلد not used in Morocco at all?
     
    If it helps, my Egyptian friend uses بلد (feminine singular) for country/hometown/area while I would tend to use بلاد (feminine singular). In this case, the Egyptian use seems to be akin to the Levantine one.
     
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