Levantine Arabic: شلبنة - شلبية

rukn

Member
English
يا ريت إنو في شوية خجل...هيك إنو منضبطها...شلبنة من...أبدا

Any help with the meaning of شلبنة and any additional examples of its use would be greatly appreciated. The quoted sentence can be found at the 7:38 mark of the video DNA 13/08/2014 ٨ اذار..ومشروع الدولة on the Youtube channel FutureTV Nadim Koteich.
 
  • لنـا

    Senior Member
    Palestinian Arabic, Hebrew
    بنت شلبية - binit shalabiyeh: a beautiful girl (as an adjective), and شلبنة is the (noun).

    It means "to make (something) beautiful". Here in the context, it means: I hope I could find a little bit of shame!... that we're making it pretty good!.... making it pleasant!....never! (it won't happen!)
     
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    Hemza

    Senior Member
    French, Mor/Hijz Arabic (heritage)
    Listening to the song البنت الشلبية yesterday, I was wondering what was the meaning of the word and I found two hypothesis:

    -Some say it comes from Turkish çelebi which was a title given to princes.

    -Some don't give information about the word's origin but rather claim it is part of Jerusalem's speech (but why a word use would be restricted to one city??)

    -Some other says it comes from Arabic meaning beautiful and go as far as linking it to a village in Southern present day Portugal (Silves) claiming the village has been named this way since the Arabic spoken there was beautiful

    Any idea? I'm lost :D

    I also know that the most famous version of the song is فيروز one but I don't think الأخوان رحباني are behind it. Does someone know when it has been written?
    Thank you.
     
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    Mahaodeh

    Senior Member
    Arabic, PA and IA.
    I did not find the word in classical dictionaries with one exception, the word شلب referring to the city. There is no reference to anything other than the city. In fact, the whole root has only one word. I doubt it has Arabic origins.

    The word is obviously colloquial and up to my knowledge limited to the Levant. It may have something to do with the Turkish çelebi meaning "master" or "gentleman" or something of the sort, with it turned into the feminine to mean perhaps "lady"; however in colloquial use the connection has been lost - if there ever was one.

    In short, I couldn't find a dependable etymology.
     

    shafaq

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Any idea? I'm lost :D
    The word "çelebi شلبي " is used along centuries in Turkish to mean "person that highly experienced in life, decorous, dignified and "non-flighty, non-giddy".

    I don't know if this information will return you "found" ...
     

    Mahaodeh

    Senior Member
    Arabic, PA and IA.
    The word "çelebi شلبي " is used along centuries in Turkish to mean "person that highly experienced in life, decorous, dignified and "non-flighty, non-giddy".
    Well, as I'm sure you know, when a word is borrowed into another language it looses much of it's original meanings and retains usually one meaning, that might with time even change.

    The word çelebi in Arab regions has been used for a few centuries as a title similar to Bey and Pasha. I understand that it actually was an official title during the Ottoman Empire, and Iraq and the Levant were part of the Empire starting some time during the first half of the 1600s. The title is no longer used, and hasn't been for almost a century, but for a few hundred years it did exist and people understood it to mean 'gentleman'.
     

    Aliph

    Senior Member
    Italian (North)
    Listening to the song البنت الشلبية yesterday, I was wondering what was the meaning of the word and I found two hypothesis:

    -Some say it comes from Turkish çelebi which was a title given to princes.
    Since I like the song I also made some researches about the Turkish word Çelebi and I found this stunning etymology . The word would be borrowed from Kurdish and the Kurds took it from Aramaic tslem-tsalmâ = idol
    (I know it’s a bit off topic)
    Çelebi — Wikipédia
     

    Mahaodeh

    Senior Member
    Arabic, PA and IA.
    changing Sad to Shin in not typical of Levantine Arabic. At least I can't think of any other example.
    No, it's not. but changing ch to sheen is. This is not about how it came to Arabic, which although I didn't find anything for certain I feel it most likely came for the Turkish chalabi. The paper is talking about where the Turkish chalabi came from.

    I'm no expert in phonetics (or linguistics for that matter) so I wouldn't know whether changing a Saad to a ch is a natural process or not. I do know, however, that English China and Arabic الصين are ultimately from the same origin so the idea doesn't seem very far fetched to me.
     

    momai

    Senior Member
    Arabic - Syria
    English China and Arabic الصين are ultimately from the same origin so the idea doesn't seem very far fetched to me.
    From Persian. Ch turns into Saad in loanwords from Persian, for instance: صنج, صيدلية/صندل, صولجان,صهريج ...
     
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