Levantine Arabic: لما بيغيبوا القطاط بيردحوا الفيران

grosdied

Senior Member
French - France
Hello there,

I know the meaning of that say, we have the equivalent in French, but I can't find the exact meaning of ردح in this context. Can someone help?
 
  • lukebeadgcf

    Senior Member
    English – US
    Hi there,

    Ayed, are you familiar with this word in Levantine Arabic?

    I'm not familiar with it at all. I think ردح in Egyptian means something like to trash-talk.

    Grosdied, can you give more context on where you came across this?
     

    ayed

    Senior Member
    Arabic(Saudi)
    Hi there,

    Ayed, are you familiar with this word in Levantine Arabic?

    I'm not familiar with it at all. I think ردح in Egyptian means something like to trash-talk.

    Grosdied, can you give more context on where you came across this?
    Yes, in our dialect means : to dance
     

    Mahaodeh

    Senior Member
    Arabic, PA and IA.
    The above phrase seems to be in Syrian Arabic. I'm not sure if in Syrian Arabic the word has the same meaning as in Palestinian Arabic but I think it does.

    In Palestinian Arabic الردح means to 'tell someone off' or 'have an argument'. It usually involves a loud voice and hand gestures but no physical fight. The things said may be directly insulting or indirectly, but it implies an exchange of insults although swearing and مسبة وشتم are usually not a requirement.

    Frankly, I've never heard the word used to mean something else but I can't be sure that it doesn't have another meaning.
     
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    Hemza

    Senior Member
    French, Mor/Hijz Arabic (heritage)
    As said by the thread's author, we have an equivalent in French: "when the cat is sleeping/is absent, mouses dance".
    In Morocco, ردح refers to the fact of stomping on the ground with the feet (and also it designates a kind of dance where women stomp on the ground and shake their long hair). Can't in mean that the mouses would dance out of joy?
     

    Mahaodeh

    Senior Member
    Arabic, PA and IA.
    In Iraq it's a type of song. In classical dictionaries it has a few meanings, none of which have anything to do with dancing, singing, or arguing (interestingly though, it does have something to do with stomping the ground to a certain degree - but in no way dancing).

    All that is irrelevant because the above proverb is not very old - my guess is that it was borrowed from French, English, or maybe even Turkish in the last couple of hundred years at the most and hence would have been borrowed directly into a dialect after the dialect has been fully formed. In this case, Levantine.

    As such the question is, does the word mean anything other than the Palestinian meaning I gave in any Levantine dialect?
     
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